Sep 18, 2020  
2018 - 2019 Saint Joseph’s College Online Catalog 
    
2018 - 2019 Saint Joseph’s College Online Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Undergraduate Courses


Undergraduate Online College

Courses

  •  

    PL 100 - Prior Learning Assessment


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify areas of their own learning from numerous settings such as training, work, community volunteering, and self-study; describe learning from experience, reflect on the learning, and synthesize ideas and the ideas of others; build a deep understanding of lifelong learning; discuss and apply experiential learning theory, models, and concepts; apply critical reflection to consider the nature and value of learning from experience; demonstrate an appropriate balance of practical and theoretical understanding; prepare learning narratives that demonstrate learning comparable to college level courses; identify research, gather, organize, and write documentation that supports learning in order to build a learning portfolio.

    Credits: 3 credits
  • Business Department

    Courses

  •  

    AC 310 - Intermediate Accounting I


    This course is intended to build on the accounting student’s basic working knowledge of accounting principles and concepts by expanding understanding of how each is applied to more complex accounting practices. The conceptual framework and FASB pronouncements established by the Financial Accounting Standards Board are the primary basis for material covered within this course and will be the guiding path for accounting courses going forward.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AC 210, AC 211

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: None
    • Final Assessment: Non-Proctored Final Exam


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Examine the challenges facing accounting and the need for accounting standards.
    • Review the objectives of financial statements, the primary financial statements, and how they are used.
    • Recognize the need for ethics in accounting.
    • Demonstrate a good understanding of basic accounting assumptions and principles.
    • Perform basic accounting functions and prepare financial statements.
    • Recognize the structure, purposes, and uses of the income statement.
    • Interpret and analyze the meaning of information contained within the income statement.
    • Recognize the interrelationship and interaction of the income statement with the other financial statements.
    • Explain the structures, compositions, and uses of the balance sheet and statement of cash flows.
    • Prepare the balance sheet and income statement from financial records.
    • Interpret and analyze the balance sheet and statement of cash flows.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    AC 311 - Intermediate Accounting II


    This course is designed to leverage the accounting student’s working knowledge of accounting principles and concepts by expanding the understanding of how each is applied to more complex accounting practices. The material in this course goes beyond the debits and credits of transactions to a more critical thinking level of the conceptual framework that directs the path of (GAAP) accounting in the United States.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AC 210, AC 211, and AC 310

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: None
    • Final Assessment: Non-Proctored Final Exam


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Explain the reporting of the current portion of long-term debt and short-term debt expected to be refinanced;
    • Identify and define the criteria applied to the accounting and disclosure of gain and loss contingencies;
    • Perform the accounting valuation of notes and bonds at date of issue and points before maturity;
    • Identify the key components (accounts) of stockholders’ equity;
    • Perform earnings per share computations in simple and complex capital structures;
    • Know the three categories of debt securities and the accounting/reporting treatment for each;
    • Recognize the categories of equity securities and the accounting/reporting treatment for each;
    • Explain the accounting for reclassification of securities from one category to another;
    • Describe and explain the various methods of revenue recognition;
    • Recognize the criteria established for determining that the earnings process is complete;
    • Differentiate between the employer’s accounting for the pension plan and pension plan accounting;
    • Describe and explain the alternative measures of the pension obligation;
    • Explore the underlying concept of capital leases;
    • Know the four criteria used to identify a capital lease transaction;
    • Value the statement of cash flows;
    • Know the major classifications and sections of the statement of cash flows; and
    • Evaluate the types of changes in accounting principles and their effect on financial reporting as well as the economic motives for such changes.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    AC 312 - Federal Income Taxes


    The application of federal income tax law is studied as it applies to individuals, partnerships, and corporations. Course content includes tax preparation, tax research, and tax planning. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AC 210

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Weekly Discussion
    • Final: No final project.


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Identify the objectives and models of taxation.
    • Compare and contrast tax planning strategies and tax rates.
    • Define income and sources of income.
    • Identify types of employee compensation and their tax consequences.
    • Identify business expenses and deductions.
    • Compare types of property, methods of acquisition, depreciation, and disposition.
    • Review and compare the benefits of tax-deferred exchanges.
    • Compare and contrast corporations, partnerships, and sole proprietorships.
    • Review individual taxation, exemptions, credits, and deductions.
    • Compare tax planning strategies for estates. 


    Credits: 3
  •  

    AC 313 - Managerial and Cost Accounting


    This course introduces you to the field of management and cost accounting, an increasingly important field in today’s competitive business environment. Management accounting is designed to provide information to managers and other decision makers internal to the company. This information is used to shape a company’s operations in the present and future.

    Where management accounting is internal to the company, the field is not governed by regulatory bodies such as the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Management accounting can take many different forms between companies and industries.

    Management accounting used to be referred to as “cost accounting.” This course deals with the basic principles of cost accumulation, allocation, and financial reporting. Over the years, though, the field has expanded. Today, management accountants are bringing value to their employers by being able to gather and analyze data and make appropriate business decisions that enhance financial viability. This course provides an understanding of the common analytical tools used by management accountants and their application in business today.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AC 310, AC 311

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussions
    • Final Assessment:  Final Paper


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Discuss the importance and purpose of managerial accounting and ethics in a business environment.
    • Prepare a schedule of cost of goods sold and cost of goods manufactured given a trial balance from a manufacturing company.
    • Compute projected sales figures in dollars and units given various costs, target net income, and what-if analysis.
    • Prepare cost-volume-profit income statements and contrast CVP income statements with traditional income statements.
    • Differentiate between absorption and variable costing income statements and describe the effect on both inventory and cost of goods sold.
    • Discuss the allocation of fixed costs and identify and use the appropriate relevant costs to make decisions related to special orders, add/drop a segment, sell or process further, and make or buy.
    • Compare and contrast job order and process costing systems relative to the value of ending inventory and cost of goods sold in a manufacturing company or cost of services rendered in a service organization.
    • Compare and contrast capital budgeting methods to make management decisions concerning potential projects, lease versus buy, and capital purchases.
    • Discuss the benefits and differences of activity-based costing as well as allocating and evaluating cost allocation and customer profitability using activity-based costing techniques.
    • Prepare the components of a static budget and a flexible budget.
    • Discuss the different budget and evaluation approaches and their effects on motivation and performance from a managerial perspective.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    AC 315 - Accounting Information Systems


    This course presents system and control concepts necessary for the design, implementation, control and audit of accounting information systems with an emphasis on the accounting cycle, database design requirements, information system controls, financial reporting, and management responsibilities for compliance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AC 310, AC 311

    Credits: 3
  •  

    AC 351 - Accounting for Governmental and Non-profit Entities


    Budgeting, accounting, auditing, and financial reporting principles and practices for government and other nonprofit entities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AC 310, AC 311

    Credits: 3
  •  

    AC 401 - Auditing


    This course is focused on the practical application of auditing processes with emphasis on assurance services provided by a public accounting practice. Areas of review include professional ethics and auditing standards, audit procedures, audit reports and client management.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AC 310, AC 311

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final: None


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Recognize the basic factors affecting an audit environment.
    • Identify accepted auditing standards.
    • Define the auditor’s role.
    • Clearly delineate what is ethical and unethical for a CPA.
    • Determine what independence is and its importance in public accounting.
    • Identify what risk is to the audit and auditor.
    • Identify and evaluate relevant and competent evidential matter.
    • Apply audit procedures both properly and timely.
    • Perform tests of internal controls


    Credits: 3
  •  

    AC 410 - Advanced Accounting


    An in-depth study of consolidated financial statements, pre-acquisition and post-acquisition reporting, purchase method and pooling method of accounting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AC 310, AC 311

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Boards
    • Final Assessment: None


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of different types and methods of business expansions and combinations.
    • Prepare journal entries using the cost, equity, or fair value method for accounting for investments.
    • Develop a consolidation worksheet using spreadsheet software, such as Microsoft Excel, which includes calculations and elimination entries for the consolidation of a subsidiary under various acquisition scenarios.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of accounting procedures used in consolidating a subsidiary when there are intercompany asset or debt transfers.
    • Prepare journal entries for the operation of a partnership, including formation, allocation of partnership profit or loss, changes in membership, and liquidation.
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the major concepts of governmental accounting.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of financial reporting and journal entry concepts for various types of private, not-for-profit entities.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    AC 420 - Advanced Topics in Financial Accounting


    An examination of advanced concepts of accounting for business combinations with emphasis on the consolidation of parent/subsidiary balance sheet and income statement reporting, foreign currency translation, partnerships formation and liquidation, as well as special reporting requirements for multinational entities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AC 310, AC 311

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Boards
    • Final Assessment: Final Paper


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Interpret and apply generally accepted accounting principles to measuring, recognizing, disclosing, and reporting financial transactions and information.
    • Recognize and apply procedures to special accounting issues in business combinations.
    • Prepare consolidated financial statements.
    • Assess inter-company transactions that relate to assets and liabilities.
    • Compute and prepare cash flows, earning per share, and tax allocation for consolidated companies.
    • Explain the basic characteristics and operating procedures of partnerships.
    • Account for partnership formation, business transactions, ownership transactions, and liquidation.
    • Define the role of the financial accountant in the organization as it pertains to accounting control and reporting including ethical responsibilities.
    • Prepare entries related to governmental entities and general fund accounting.
    • Prepare entries to record transactions related to not-for-profit entities.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    AC 450 - Accounting for Leadership


    This accounting course emphasizes the managerial aspect of accounting with a degree of attention to the general or financial accounting that is the fundamental base for all accounting information. The course introduces the structure and purpose of the traditional financial statements, basic interpretation of financial statements through standard statement analysis, various control elements such as budgeting and finally coverage of the time value of money concept and its application in the valuation of fixed income securities (specifically fixed rate notes/bonds).

    Credits: 3
  •  

    BA 301 - Business Law I


    This course is an introduction to the areas of law that touch most businesses and nonprofit organizations as well as many individuals. The course begins with an overview of the American legal system and its processes and progresses through substantive topics such as contracts, criminal law, tort law, and intellectual property. The lessons will ask you to digest and then apply the concepts of law, often with a critical thinking component. After completing this course, you will have learned enough to discuss and apply basic concepts of law as well as evaluate the potential risks and/or issues.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: None


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Understand how the American legal system is structured between the federal government and the states.
    • Describe the steps in the litigation process.
    • Comprehend and summarize court opinions.
    • Identify a contract and explain what is required for a valid contract to exist.
    • Explain how a contract may be breached and what might constitute an appropriate remedy.
    • Specify the basic elements of common crimes and torts.
    • Analyze how tort law intersects with economics and social attitudes.
    • Assess the utility and application of white-collar crime laws.
    • Understand the differences between business entities and articulate their characteristics.
    • Address the social responsibility of business entities and their duties.
    • Identify the laws relevant to the employment relationship and understand the rights and obligations involved.
    • Explain the types of intellectual property laws available to protect original works. 


    Credits: 3
  •  

    BA 306 - Business Ethics


    Examines the application of ethics to various components of business, including organizational, marketing, personnel, and financial matters.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Students have the option of choosing a Community-Based Learning section of this course.

    Community Based Learning:

    Community-based learning (CBL) is an experiential instructional strategy that engages students in solving problems within their schools and communities as part of their academic studies, transforming them from passive recipients to active participants in their education and community while providing a deeper understanding of theories and course content.

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 4 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of the course, you should be able to do the following

    • Describe the historical underpinnings of the corporate social responsibility and business ethics movements.
    • Identify major challenges that businesses face in operating ethically, and propose solutions to at least three of those issues through interacting with a contemporary business or nonprofit leader.
    • Interview a business or nonprofit leader about a significant problem that the organization is facing in its relationship with the community and offer one or two reasonable solutions to that issue.
    • Distinguish between horizontal and vertical accountability, and compare and contrast their effectiveness in addressing issues of ethical compliance and entrepreneurial growth.
    • Suggest strategies to a current business or nonprofit leader that will assist him or her in achieving greater competence than before in participating in a “knowledge-based economy.”
    • Map the common obstacles that leaders face in making decisions in the face of complexity and failing at projects that they thought would succeed, and propose best practices for navigating those challenges.
    • Describe how one business or entity has been shaped by external values, as well as how it has shaped the values of the surrounding community.
    • Identify three to four personal strengths that will assist the student in being an effective and authentic leader, while also addressing three to four personal weaknesses that confront that journey.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    BA 350 - Management Information Systems for Managers


    This course investigates the application of computer-based information systems to the management of organizations. The focus of the course is developing the non-technical skills that business-school graduates need to make appropriate decisions about the deployment of information systems throughout an organization. Students in this course learn about the interaction between information systems and organization structure, necessary technology infrastructure, knowledge management, and the creation and management of information systems. The ethical management of information to gain competitive advantage is a theme throughout the course.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Paper

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Discuss the interaction among the components of an information system, including the hardware, software, data, networks, people, and procedures.
    • Evaluate emergent information technologies on their potential application to an organization.
    • Interpret ethical and social issues relating to the storage and dissemination of information and the use of information systems.
    • Describe the strategic role of information systems in organizations and their use in gaining competitive advantage.
    • Define the role of information systems in capturing and distributing organization knowledge and intelligence and in enhancing management decision making.
    • Choose the correct terminology associated with information systems when interacting with IS professionals.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    FI 301 - Business Finance


    Explore the concepts and techniques used for determining the need for the acquisition and management of capital resources for firms including financial analysis, forecasting, leveraging, capital budgeting, time value of money, investment banking, common and preferred stock, financing, and bond evaluation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AC 210

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 15 Week Course 
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project 


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    •  Understand the role of the corporate financial manager and the three main policy questions he/she faces: investment, capital structure, and dividend decisions.
    • Determine the statement of cash flow given a statement of earnings and a statement of financial position.
    • Apply common financial ratios in evaluating both “actual” and “pro-forma” financial statements.
    • Apply common sizing in financial analysis and planning.
    • Utilize the time value of money formulas to evaluate various alternatives.
    • Utilize the discounted cash flow metrics such as net present value (NPV), expected net present value, modified internal rate of return (MIRR), and modified profitability index in order to evaluate proposed projects. 
    • Determine the weighted average cost of capital and its component parts for the cost of debt, cost of preferred stock, and cost of common stock, the latter by using the capital asset pricing model as well as other techniques.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IN 310 - International Marketing


    This course has been designed to familiarize students with the international marketing process. The course exposes the student to the different sociocultural, economic and geopolitical environments in which global marketing strategies and programs are formulated and implemented; helps develop relevant management skills for planning and expanding activities in global markets; and gives students the opportunity for an in-depth analysis of one particular country focusing on the cultural implications of exporting a product to that country. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MK 201

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments:  5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final:  Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Apply key terms, definitions, and concepts used in marketing with a global perspective.
    • Compare and contrast the value of developing a global awareness vs. a local perspective in marketing.
    • Assess market opportunities used by multi-national companies (MNC) in a global market.
    • Evaluate different cultural, legal and political environments shaping international trade.
    • Examine various strategic marketing tactics used by MNCs.
    • Analyze local market characteristics that affect advertising and promotion of products on a global scale.
    • Illustrate the impact of global and regional influences on products and services for consumers and businesses.
    • Apply basic marketing-oriented strategies on the international level.
    • Create innovative market entry strategies suitable on a global scale.
    • Explain the differences in negotiating with partners from different countries.
    • Develop an effective international marketing plan for use in global markets.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    MG 302 - Human Resources Management


    This course is designed for students with nominal exposure to human resources management, policies and procedures.  The program of study presents the operational context for managing an organization’s workforce in the 21st century with insight into the procedures and processes.  Subject matter ranges from historical perspectives to current trends and challenges from legal, social, economic and technological perspectives. This course provides a systems level rationale to the wide ranging, every growing scope of human resources management in public and nonprofit organizations. 

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Analyze the diverse functions of human resources management.
    • Explain the benefits of technology on the human resources function.
    • Relate the trends and challenges currently facing HR departments and staff to your work experience or employment goals.
    • Apply the components of a job analysis and job descriptions to a sample position.
    • Explain the relationship of motivation theories to performance management systems.
    • Summarize the importance of volunteer assistance to public and nonprofit organizations.

     

    Credits: 3


  •  

    MG 307 - Small Business Management


    Explores the role of the small business in the American economy. The various forms of business ownership, financing, risk management, human resource management, marketing, and the necessary information systems will be examined in-depth. Emphasis will be placed on the formulation of a comprehensive business plan.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 15 Week Course
    • Interactivity: 4 Units
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Assess the personality characteristics typical of an entrepreneur.
    • Identify the practical business skills needed to operate a small business.
    • Communicate in the language of small business.
    • Demonstrate the ability to assess the validity of a business idea.
    • Develop a comprehensive business plan (including the marketing and financial sections).
    • Assess factors demonstrating small business growth and their consequences.
    • Discuss technology applications for improving small business margins.
    • Illustrate the relationship of administrative, internal systems to external systems of sales and customer service.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    MG 309 - Organizational Behavior


    This course explains the intrapersonal (you) and interpersonal (you and others) components within a third dynamic of organizational behavior. What prompts our reactions, our interests and behaviors in the workplace? What impact can personalities have on job motivation and performance levels? What leadership skills are required to influence performance and productivity in the workplace? You will examine theories of motivation, communication, leadership, power and change with practical relation to contemporary issues. We will also study organizations and reward systems aimed at improved performance and organizational efficiency through employee motivation programs, participative management and cooperative decision-making.  

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
     Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Develop interpersonal competencies in the field of organizational behavior.
    • Explain why human relations skills are important to success in the workplace
    • Demonstrate understanding of how self-concept affects productivity and performance.
    • Describe the role of interpersonal communications and communication channels within an organization.
    • Analyze how interpersonal dynamics affect behavior, performance and productivity.
    • Explain the components of motivation theories and techniques.
    • Explain the interactive role of ethics with leadership skills, organizational culture and hierarchy.
    • Describe the implications of group dynamics and team management.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    MG 311 - Change Management


    The term organizational change refers to system-wide change and not change that concerns modifications to program or process. It involves major restructuring – a transformation – of beliefs, values, mission, operations and/or the infusion of new technologies. This course will explore the strong resistances to change and identify approaches to facilitating a successful transformation of an organization. Internet access required.

     

     

    Students have the option of choosing a Community-Based Learning section of this course.

    Community Based Learning:

    Community-based learning (CBL) is an experiential instructional strategy that engages students in solving problems within their schools and communities as part of their academic studies, transforming them from passive recipients to active participants in their education and community while providing a deeper understanding of theories and course content.

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 4 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
     Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Differentiate between the various forces of change.
    • Demonstrate knowledge on the requirements for change initiatives and adaptation.
    • Explain the implementation process for change in organizations.
    • Develop an understanding of the importance of communication in the change management process.
    • Analyze the personal side of change within organizations
    • Evaluate the long-term need for change as a constant part of organizational existence. 


    Credits: 3

  •  

    MG 320 - Conflict Management and Mediation


    Focuses on the nature and practice of conflict resolution and negotiation. The intent is to increase awareness, develop skills and build knowledge of constructive conflict management processes and approaches, as well as mediation strategies and practices. The course explores how our personal histories impact our perceptions regarding our approach to conflict and mediation.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 4 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Paper


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe the nature and causes of conflict.
    • Identify communication skills and negotiation techniques for conflict resolution.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of mediation and the role of the mediator.
    • Identify facilitative strategies for the mediator.
    • Apply conflict-resolution skills and mediation methods in the workplace and other real-life situations.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    MG 330 - International Management


    Surveys the various forces (e.g., environmental, political, social, cultural) that impact how business is carried out abroad. The course analyzes and explores the various management and operational strategies of firms engaged in international business.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Develop a global mindset.
    • Understand intercultural effectiveness.
    • Become a global manager utilizing the MBI model.
    • Create a strategic global organization.
    • Understand personal and business integrity in the global marketplace. 


    Credits: 3
  •  

    MG 410 - Strategic Management


    This course focuses on the management process involved in strategic planning and cross-functional decision-making. This process involves the creation, formulation, and implementation of strategy and policy; the necessity of and problems resulting from functional integration and human interaction; the planning, organizing, and controlling processes; the evaluation of risks and alternatives; and management philosophies and ideologies. 

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments:  5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final:  Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the history of strategic management and how it has progressed to an increased capacity to think strategically and effectively employ the elements of the strategic management process to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage.
    • Describe the nature and role of the vision and mission statements in strategic management and how they are used to integrate analysis and intuition in the work of strategic management.
    • Describe how to effectively use strategic management tools such as an external strategic management audit, an internal strategic management review, and benchmarking to assess an organization’s processes and capabilities.
    • Describe how to implement a strategy in such a way as to deal effectively with issues of implementation challenges, organizational structure, market analysis, and any estimated change in the valuation of a business.
    • Describe a practical framework for evaluating strategies and why this evaluation is complex, sensitive, and yet essential for organizational success.
    • Explain why the importance of ethical principles and organizational values in the context of making socially responsible management choices is good business in strategic management.
    • Explain how a business can ensure that its code of business ethics is guiding business decisions and not being ignored.
    • Prepare a robust strategic analysis covering all of the important aspects of strategic management.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how to use a strategic analysis to create meaningful recommendations for a business organization.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    MG 415 - Creativity and Innovation


    Organizations today face unprecedented changes amid evolving technology in a global environment.  Increasingly, only those capable of innovation can survive.  Creativity that generates ideas to solve problems and turns them into action is a critical strategic capability for issues ranging from inventing breakthrough products and services to organization transformation and vision. But what does it really mean to be creative?  What skills do individuals and teams need?  How does an organization foster rather than hinder innovation?  What are the larger forces that exert effects?  This course provides students with both a conceptual and applied understanding of creativity and innovation. The focus is on how to transform concepts into action, both individually and as leaders and members of groups and organizations.

    Course Learning Objectives
    • Describe the difference between routine work and creative work.

    • Outline the range of influences on creative action in organizations - from individual cognition to global competition.

    • Develop a personal practice to nurture and sustain your own creativity and to support others on your team.

    • Initiate and undertake a creative process that applies creative thinking to an organizational situation or problem.

    • Explain effects of approaches to problem solving, team processes, and organizational design and culture on innovation in organizations.

    • Analyze team processes and organizational practices that lead to effective innovation.

    • Synthesize your understanding of the creative process to recommend approaches to the power and politics of innovation.



    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    MK 301 - Advertising


    This course examines the role of advertising in the creation of brand value, using the communication platform to integrate and add value to brands, through clearer understanding and alignment of the target market, message, media and other components of the promotional mix.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MK 201

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe the role of advertising as part of the marketing mix.
    • Explain the importance of target markets and segmentation in the development of advertising plans.
    • Demonstrate the ability to recognize the power of a brand and its equity.
    • Analyze traditional forms of advertising for messaging and effectiveness.
    • Evaluate the role of advertising and how it is evolving for major companies and brands.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    MK 302 - Marketing Research


    This course introduces students to Marketing Research. It explores the critical importance of Marketing Research through environment, customers, and competitors. Specific areas of investigation will include tools and techniques used to obtain valuable information for better decision-making.   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MK 201

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
     Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Define Marketing Research.
    • Examine the research process.
    • Formulate the fundamental principles of Marketing Research.  
    • Evaluate data collection and research design.
    • Apply knowledge of tools and applications


    Credits: 3
  •  

    MK 305 - Consumer Behavior


    In this course we will study the various factors influencing consumer behavior as a means of predicting response to a product or service and as a critical step in developing a successful marketing plan, in so doing we will assess purchases we made in the past, purchases we are considering today and the factors that drive the consumer’s decisions.

    Credits: 3
  •  

    MK 307 - Customer Relations Management


    This course introduces students to the increasing role of service in providing superior value to customers. It explores the critical importance of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) through customer development, customer retention, social CRM, and technology. Specific areas of investigation will include customer value, customer loyalty, CRM technology, and the future of CRM. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MK 201

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 15 Weeks, 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: PowerPoint Presentation


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Define Customer Relationship Management (CRM).
    • Identify the history and development of CRM.
    • Examine the increasing roles of how technology is contributing to providing higher levels of customer satisfaction.
    • Evaluate the impact of CRM on sales and marketing strategies in the development of customer value, retention, and loyalty.
    • Identify the growing role of CRM and its future.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    MK 310 - E-Marketing


    Managers in every organization today must have a fundamental grasp of how the Internet affects their business. On the information superhighway, if you don’t stay on top of developments, you do get run over. This course provides necessary tools to create, develop and expand E-Business strategies.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    MK 201

    Credits: 3
  •  

    MK 401 - Marketing Management


    In this course we will cover important marketing principles and then we will go on to apply those principles in developing a marketing plan for a product/service defined early in the course. The marketing plan calls for your analysis of consumers, competitors and the external environment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MK 201

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments:  5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Boards
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Define the key internal and external resources that are often part of the marketing management process and/or oversight.
    • Identify the competition, customers, and the markets served and the role market analysis plays within an organization.
    • Identify the buying behavior life-cycle for both business-to-consumer (B2C) purchases as well as business-to-business (B2B) purchases.
    • Describe how market research reduces risk and improves decision making.
    • Discuss effective ways to incorporate social media into your marketing strategy.
    • Thoroughly understand the advertising and media plan and how to apply it in the real world.
    • Identify the role public relations takes in an organization and how it can leverage a marketing plan.
    • Evaluate the role emotions play when consumers make a buying decision.
    • Examine the theory of the product life cycle (PLC).
    • Apply communications theories to practical marketing situations.
    • Evaluate what is considered a viable marketing metric when determining ROI vs. one that isn’t.
    • Assess how to prepare budgets to ensure proper planning.
    • Develop a marketing plan based on the SOSTAC® methodology and the cumulative knowledge and information gained in the course. 


    Credits: 3
  •  

    MK 410 - Branding


    This course is designed to help students understand and manage key elements of a strong brand strategy. Through engaging discussions and thoughtful reading, students will develop an understanding of brand management and the myriad of factors that contribute to building and sustaining brand equity. Supported by timely and relevant journal articles and textbooks, students will have a sound understanding of what is involved when analyzing all aspects of a brand and what goes into developing a strategic plan to build brand equity. Effective brand management is a result of several major factors, among them the four critical elements of a brand and analytical approach, all of which will be explored throughout the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe the main branding challenges and opportunities
    • Understand the importance of a personal brand
    • Recognize the strongest brands today and what elements makes them strong
    • Identify the key components of brand positioning
    • Specify the four steps of building a brand
    • Examine the brand value chain
    • Illustrate the brand equity concept
    • Recognize what goes into a successful brand marketing program
    • Define key components of brand architecture
    • Summarize how consumers evaluate extensions and how extensions contribute to parent brand equity
    • Understand Susan Fournier’s typology of consumer-brand relationships


    Credits: 3 credits
  •  

    MK 415 - Social Media Marketing


    This course examines the role of Social Media in marketing for brands and organizations and highlights how to build brand awareness with social media through content creation, visual storytelling, knowing your audience, and understanding the most popular social media platforms for business. This class is a blend of understanding how to create a presence on social media as well as how to use the different platforms. The goal is to give you the skills you need to be able to log on to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. and start creating content and visuals that promotes brand awareness.

    Key to this class is using the skills you have learned as part of a “Community Based Learning” strategy. The materials you create in the class will build upon your skills and knowledge to create social media content for your chosen organization.  You’ll create material for your chosen organization for potential use on their social media accounts as well as create informational materials for them to help inform how to better leverage their social media presence.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

     

    • Describe the role and impact Social Media has played on modern society.
    • Explain the importance of knowing your audience, developing content, and understanding industry best-practices.
    • Demonstrate the ability to use different Social Media platforms.
    • Analyze traditional Social Media outlets for messaging and effectiveness.
    • Evaluate the needs of a company or organization and develop a Social Media promotion that suits them.


    Credits: 3 Credits

  •  

    SA 301 - Principles of Sales (Salesmanship)


    The initial focus of the course is on the sales function, learned persuasive techniques will have value in many other areas of social and professional life that range from job interviewing to effective business meetings. This course also focuses on enhancing ones ability to use appropriate, ethical communications that help one to accomplish their objectives.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MK 201

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Recognize the parallelism of professional-selling skills to persuasion/influencing-skills that are needed by business professionals, including those who are in non-sales positions.
    • Describe the importance of professional development as a critical factor that contributes to a sales representative’s success, including key areas in which a sales representative would want to gain expertise.
    • Apply key communication tools and learning to your day-to-day business environment to facilitate your ability to be seen by others as a persuasive and influential individual.

      Additionally, you will gain an understanding of the following:

    • The Selling Cycle – The Buying Cycle
    • FAB – Features, Advantages, Benefits
    • Selling/Persuading/Communication Techniques
    • Effective Professional Presentation Techniques
    • Sales, as part of the marketing concept
    • Interactions with people – Managing your interpersonal relationships
    • Dressing for success


    Credits: 3

  •  

    SA 304 - Sales Management


    This course consists of a study of sales management competencies, including how to effectively manage a field sales force with an emphasis on structural planning and operational control over recruitment, training, retention, supervision, motivation, compensation and performance evaluation of sales personnel. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MK 201

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments:  5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Boards
    • Final Assessment: Final Paper


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Comprehend and accurately describe the roles of sales management and sales managers.
    • Understand the importance of culture to selling.
    • Recognize key leadership traits necessary for strong sales management performance.
    • Outline a sales process and articulate its role in selling.
    • Develop a plan for recruiting a sales team.
    • Accurately portray the role of a professional sales manager on a high-performance sales team.
    • Create and use accurate metrics for evaluating sales performance.
    • Select appropriate methods for corrective action for an under performing sales organization.
    • Describe the impact of automation on the selling process.
    • Articulate the impact of mobile technology on the selling organization.

     

    Credits: 3


  • Health Administration Department

    Courses

  •  

    HA 205 - American Healthcare Systems


    This course provides an introduction and overview of the United States healthcare system. The overview includes the concepts of health and healthcare, including consumer healthcare-seeking behaviors. The course describes the roles of government and the private sector, and the varied, constantly changing levels of care in the U.S. health system. Included in this course is information about future healthcare reform as it relates to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Understand the history and basic nature of the United States healthcare system.
    • Explain the impact of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 on the provision of healthcare services.
    • Describe the current operations of healthcare systems in general.
    • Explain the role of the government in healthcare services and the responsibility for public health.
    • Contrast inpatient and outpatient services.
    • Describe the roles of the healthcare workforce in the U.S.
    • Explain the financing of U.S. healthcare services.
    • Identify the impact of managed care on the delivery of healthcare services.
    • Explain the importance of information technology in healthcare. 
    • Discuss healthcare law and ethics and their impact on healthcare services and providers.
    • Describe the way in which mental health issues impact the delivery of healthcare services.
    • Analyze the effectiveness of the U.S. healthcare system.


    Credits: 3 Offered: February, May, August, and November
  •  

    HA 214 - Healthcare Informatics


    Focuses on the application of information sciences in health care settings. The emphasis is on the management of information and its use in clinical and administrative settings rather than the technology itself. Topics include collaborative technologies, applications, management systems, ethics, the information life cycle, information ownership, strategy, and the transformation of data to information.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Compare paper-based and computerized health information management systems
    • Assimilate the core components of health information management systems and how they are integrated
    • Analyze how health information systems may be used strategically to improve health care outcomes and efficiency
    • Demonstrate how health informatics contributes to quality improvement and evidence-based practices
    • Identify the ethical and legal issues associated with health information management and how computerization may ameliorate or exacerbate each issue


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HA 302 - Human Resource Management


    This course focuses on strategic human resource management in today’s health care industry and encourages you to apply these concepts in your workplace. The basics of human resource management are covered with an emphasis on analysis and practical applications in your current organizational environment. The application of a strategic focus to the human resource management field allows you to anticipate and create opportunities for change. The key concepts underlying the components of human resource management are cost-measured.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    1.      Demonstrate knowledge of the organizational, legal, and environmental forces that create the framework for human resource management.

    2.      Evaluate and redesign processes and programs to target the organizational mission and goals.

    3.      Understand the strategic components of human resource management, and analyze opportunities in your workplace.

    4.      Apply the principles and practices of this course in the healthcare field, particularly as it relates to the following:

    a.       Diverse personnel working in the healthcare field.

    b.      The role of human resource management as it applies to all aspects of the workplace.

    c.       Changes in the workplace due to changes in the demographics of the workforce.

    d.      The relationship of workplace components and their collective ability to meet healthcare industry demands.

    e.       Legal requirements pertaining to the labor force.

    Credits: 3 Offered: February, May, August, and November


  •  

    HA 330 - Healthcare Administration: Management Foundations


    This course provides an introduction to the management of health care organizations (HCOs).  It starts with a broad view of management and leadership including a comprehensive look at management theories, how they have evolved over time, and how they can be applied to today’s health care administration challenges. The course content examines the skills and abilities that a health care manager will need to be effective.  In an increasingly complex world, these skills are many and varied.  A health care manager in the twenty-first century must understand the personnel management skills of employee motivation, team work, conflict management, and communication.  The manager of today must also manage technical processes including information technology, clinical technology, quality improvement, and regulatory requirements. In addition, the manager is expected to assure that patients have a satisfactory experience along with an excellent clinical outcome. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205, LTC 210, or NU 300

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    1. Identify activities for professional development
    2. Understand the concept of value
    3. Recognize the complexity of healthcare systems and factors inhibiting change
    4. Explain how management and organizational theories influence healthcare systems
    5. Differentiate between leadership and management
    6. Discover and explain your personal leadership style using contemporary leadership theory and principles
    7. Assess your personal leadership style. 
    8. Apply Leadership and management techniques to a case study.
    9. Explain healthcare governance
    10. Demonstrate healthcare leadership structures
    11. Develop an effective communication process for a meeting with an executive board and high level organizational groups.
    12. Apply the various theories of employee motivation.
    13. Describe the popular, but misleading, myths about motivation. 
    14. Explain the role of finding purpose in work as it relates to employee motivation.
    15. Identify possibilities for developing and mentoring staff
    16. Apply the factors that contribute to high-performing teams
    17. Develop strategies for creating highly effective teams
    18. Explain optional methods for team consensus building and decision-making.
    19. Describe common communication barriers and effective ways to overcome these barriers.
    20. Apply effective communication techniques to a case study.
    21. Explain the importance of participating in enterprise-wide committees and networking with peers inside and outside of the organization
    22. Analyze power relationships
    23. Apply conflict management techniques
    24. Understand the role of organizational politics
    25. Compare negotiation techniques and using influence effectively
    26. Explain the different categories of quality measures.
    27. Compare and contrast two quality frameworks
    28. Interpret change management theories and techniques leaders use facilitate change and adjust to value based purchasing processes.
    29. Describe the evolution of information technology in healthcare
    30. Apply a process to plan and implement information technology improvements.
    31. Understand the concepts of strategy and strategic management
    32. Describe the main features of the concepts of mission, vision and values
    33. Develop a SWOT analysis
    34. Explain the factors that lead to healthcare alliances by utilizing a contemporary example
    35. Identify the benefits and risks of healthcare alliances
    36. Plan for minimizing risk exposure
    37. Identify the most important federal and state regulatory programs and how they affect healthcare management
    38. Recommend strategies for maintaining compliance while creating a joint venture
    39. Identify the key concepts of healthcare consumerism and how they impact healthcare organizations and healthcare providers specifically
    40. Integrate and demonstrate your learning from this course.


    Credits: 3 Offered: February, May, August, and November
  •  

    HA 340 - Emergency Preparedness


    Natural and manmade disasters have grabbed the headlines in the past few years.  Accrediting, licensing, and regulatory organizations have developed standards for emergency planning for medical providers.   Even when plans are in place, there is often a nagging doubt whether they truly prepare staff for all factors faced in extreme situations.  Health care organizations need skilled leaders to address emergency preparedness and medical disaster planning. Thorough emergency plans and disaster drills can prepare healthcare workers for the potential of an emergency. This course will provide participants with current information on a variety of topics to better address emergency preparedness for healthcare systems before, during, and after disasters.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210, or equivalent

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate leadership skills in the following:

    1. Identify the different types of emergencies that may occur within health organizations or within the community that requires health facility response.
    2. Understand security, risk communication and media activities in disasters and other emergencies.
    3. Describe patient management in disaster response including trauma, triage, mass fatality management and coordination with outside agencies.
    4. Apply best practices for drill and exercise design and evaluation.
    5. Create an emergency plan for a health organization.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    HA 343 - Healthcare Financial Management


    Includes an overall explanation of financial accounting terminology and how it works, review of financial reports (i.e., income statements, balance sheets, budgets, subsidiary ledgers, and cost reports), and the managerial component that is necessary for everyday management in a healthcare setting. The course uses actual examples from hospitals, long-term care facilities and home health agencies, as well as case studies, to prepare students to read, analyze, understand and use financial statements and budgets. An ideal course for non-financial managers who need basic knowledge of financial management and healthcare finance, and also serves as an introductory course for those who will be more directly involved in the financial aspects of healthcare.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Basic accounting and financial management concepts and terminology
    • Financial analysis and its role in managerial decision making
    • Cost determination and allocation as a management tool
    • The role of budgets, and how to develop them, interpret them, and use them to manage more effectively
    • How to manage assets, make capital investment decisions, and secure capital financing


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HA 350 - Leadership in Healthcare Administration


    Helps students assess their current leadership and management styles and behaviors, understand behaviors which are associated with effective leadership in health care, and identify steps they can take to improve their leadership skills. The course presents personal and organizational factors that affect leadership and management effectiveness and influence organizational behavior.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210 or LTC 310

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Identify and discuss the theoretical and applied components of effective leadership and management in health care
    • Define the role vision plays in leadership
    • Examine and apply the leadership skills you have achieved


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HA 353 - Legal Aspects of Healthcare Administration


    Provides an introduction to law and the legal process as it relates to health administration. It includes areas of public accountability; liability and health care providers; rights of patients; and administrative and business law for health care organizations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210.

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Explain key concepts regarding the legal aspects of health care administration. 
    • Apply major theories and doctrines that frame health care law. 
    • Describe the basis, structure, and process of the legal system in the United States today. 
    • Evaluate the scope of accountability of organizations, health care administrators, and trustees in various situations. 
    • Discuss legal issues and accountabilities regarding professional licensure and scope of practice. 
    • Determine the administrative obligations in relation to consents, protections, confidentiality, and patients’ rights. 
    • Describe the legal aspects of antitrust, corporate status, and corporate compliance in health care today. 
    • Assess and discuss the relationship between the law and legal doctrines, and personal and clinical ethics in administrative decision making.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HA 355 - Ethics in Health Administration


    Focuses on developing an understanding of the ethical theories and principles found in the everyday practice of health care. This is known as normative ethics. Emphasis is placed on the identification, analysis, and application of ethical principles and theories in health care delivery settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Explain the theories and principles relevant to health care ethics
    • Identify and discuss the ethical issues inherent in the provision of individual health care, including the evolving responses to new ethical problems
    • Apply ethical theories and principles to health care problems facing the health services administrator and the structures of organizational governance
    • Recognize, discuss, and analyze critical ethical issues in health care delivery within our society
    • Analyze and articulate reasoned approaches to resolve ethical concerns in health care delivery
    
     


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HA 410 - Quality in Healthcare Administration


    This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the critical elements of an effective approach to quality in a health care organization.  The student will be able to define the importance of measurement, variation and the use of tools in approach to continuous quality improvement.  The student will be able to synthesize information related to the use of teams, the importance of the voice of the customer, and the approach to change.  In addition, there will also be an opportunity to compare and contrast the approach to continuous quality improvement in light of the external – ever shifting – regulatory and political environment.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Discuss the elements of an effective continuous quality improvement program to include strategic focus of support, a systems view to improvement, and a whole systems approach toward outcomes.
    • Illustrate the importance of using data and measurement to assess current status, analyze and improve processes, and track progress to affect outcomes.  Identify the tools and methods used to collect and provide data and information to include quality methodologies (PDSA), means of display (flowcharts, run charts, cause-and-effect diagrams), and the use of benchmarking in creation of improvements.
    • Explain the importance of high-performing teams to achieve quality improvement outcomes.  Describe the elements necessary for effective teams, the benefits of using teams in a learning organization, and the outcomes impact when teams are empowered.
    • Interpret the involvement and effect of external facilitators of improvement to include regulatory agencies, payers, QIO).
    • Characterize the elements necessary for an organization to have to demonstrate continuous evolvement of its quality program in response to data, results, and intervention.


    Credits: 3 Offered: February, May, August, and November
  •  

    HA 454 - Strategic Planning in Healthcare Organizations (effective 3/1/2017)


    This course will provide you with the basic elements of a strategic planning and implementation process.  It takes a step-by-step approach to outline a planning process that could be applied in a variety of health care settings.  The process is targeted at an organization-wide planning process, but many of the elements could be applied to a department or division within a larger organizational structure as long as the overall organization’s priorities and direction are considered.  A primary purpose of strategic planning is to create alignment throughout an organization. Strategic planning is not an event it is an ongoing approach to management.

    HA 454 uses a series of templates to develop a mock strategic plan for a case study healthcare organization. The case study will be chosen by the individual student based on professional interests. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    1. Define strategic planning.
    2. Identify benefits of strategic planning.
    3. Identify obstacles to successful strategic planning.
    4. Develop a strategic planning process for a case study healthcare organization.
    5. Explain the roles and responsibilities of stakeholder groups.
    6. Define and explain the elements of an effective mission statement
    7. Define and explain the elements of an effective vision statement
    8. For a case study healthcare organization, analyze how well the mission statement meets the definition of an effective statement.
    9. For a case study healthcare organization, analyze how well the vision statement meets the definition of an effective statement.
    10. For a case study healthcare organization, develop an appropriate service area description.
    11. For a case study healthcare organization, develop an external environmental assessment.
    12. Interpret results of external assessment to identify key findings. 
    13. For your case study healthcare organization (HCO), develop a competitor analysis.
    14. Interpret results to identify key findings.
    15. For a case study healthcare organization (HCO), develop an internal assessment.
    16. Interpret results to identify key findings.
    17. Develop a SWOT analysis for a case study healthcare organization (HCO).
    18. Develop critical / strategic issues for a case study HCO.
    19. Develop goal statements for a case study healthcare organization (HCO).
    20. Develop measures of success for a case study HCO.
    21. Develop objectives for a case study healthcare organization (HCO).
    22. Establish appropriate target dates to complete objectives for a case study HCO.
    23. Develop a plan to communicate strategic plan initiatives to each stakeholder group.
    24. Develop an action plan / implementation process for a case study healthcare organization.
    25. Develop presentation for a board of directors providing an update on strategic plan progress and outlining needed updates.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    HIM 100 - Introduction to Health Information Management


    This course provides an overview of health information management within the broader context of healthcare delivery systems and patient information systems. The evolution of health records from paper to electronic will be explored.  Vocabularies and classification systems will be introduced, and the field of health information professionals will be discussed, including review of the core model and code of ethics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None 

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final exam

    Course Learning Objectives
    1. Identify the basic organization of the various types of hospitals and healthcare organizations, and the impact of external forces on the industry.
    2. Examine the evolution, development and maintenance of health records.
    3. Differentiate among and identify the correct uses of classifications, vocabularies, terminologies, and standards.
    4. Compare and contrast the educational requirements, credentialing requirements, and roles and functions of a Registered Health Information Administrator (RHIA) and Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT).
    5. Explain the requirements for maintaining certification as a RHIA and RHIT.
    6. Interpret the health information management (HIM) professional core model.
    7. Research the growing settings of practice available to HIM professionals in traditional and non-traditional settings and describe HIM functions in these settings.
    8. Research job descriptions for the following HIM functions and compare and contrast the duties and responsibilities for each: Coding, Clinical Documentation Improvement, Informatics Governance, Release of Information, and Quality Improvement.
    9. Describe the importance of a professional code of ethics and specifically the HIM Code of Ethics.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HIM 200 - Introduction to Anatomy & Physiology


    Familiarizes the student with basic concepts of human anatomy and physiology. At the conclusion of this course, the student will demonstrate a basic knowledge of the structure and the function of the various parts of the body, as well as the terminology for identifying cells, tissues, organ systems and body parts.  Topics include: the language of medicine, organization of the body, cellular foundations, and tissues and membranes. The body systems covered include: skeletal, muscular, integumentary, cardiovascular, lymphatic and immune, respiratory, nervous, sensory, endocrine, gastrointestinal, urinary, and reproductive.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course does not have a lab.  No prerequisites.

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons/assignments and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course you should be able to:

    • Understand the basic systems of the human body, with its components
    • Examine how each body system works and how the body systems interact with each other for normal functioning
    • Recognize the importance of health information managers understanding the systems and functions of the human body


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HIM 210 - Medical Terminology


    Studies medical terminology, the language of healthcare services.  The course focuses on the terminology health information managers will need to know in order accurately understand and code diagnoses in health records.  Students will begin by learning the Greek and Latin words that comprise medical terminology and how the terms are built.  Terms related to each of the body systems will be learned, in relation to anatomical terms, pathological terms, and procedural and other treatment terms.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    none

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:
     

    • Explain terms for body structures and directional terminology.
    • Describe terms used for the major body systems and their components.
    • Understand how body systems work together to perform needed body functions.


    Credits: 3 Offered: February, May, August, and November
  •  

    HIM 211 - Pharmacology


    Focuses on the principles of pharmacology including drug classifications and the effects on the body. Pharmakinetic and pharmacodynamic components of drug actions will be reviewed. Utilizing the nursing process, emphasis is placed on the nursing implications that relate to medication administration, actions, side effects, interactions, and contraindications of medications. Social, economic, developmental, cultural, ethical, and legal considerations that pertain to drug administration will also be investigated.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HIM 210 and HIM 200 or other Anatomy & Physiology 

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Define key terminology used in pharmacology. 
    • Correlate the nursing process with the study of pharmacology. 
    • Identify the legal and ethical principles of medication administration. 
    • Apply the pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic phases of drug activity, and alterations in these, to specific medications. 
    • Utilize the nursing process, cultural assessments, critical-thinking skills, and experience to explain the principles of medication administration to clients. 
    • Formulate teaching plans for clients in relation to their prescribed medications. 


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HIM 212 - Pathophysiology


    Examines alterations in functions affecting individuals across the lifespan. The student will explore pathophysiological concepts utilizing biology, microbiology, and physiological sciences as a basis for the student approach. The scientific approach will provide a further understanding of the mechanisms of disease, and students will incorporate critical thinking skills with practical application. The course provides a comprehensive nursing approach to common alterations in body systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HIM 210 and HIM 200 (or other Anatomy & Physiology) 

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Define the terminology and the pathological processes throughout the course. 
    • Describe the normal structure and function of cell, tissue, organ, and body systems. 
    • Correlate normal body functioning to physiologic changes that occur as a result of disease processes. 
    • Apply the sciences of pathophysiology to common system disorders across the lifespan. 
    • Utilize the nursing process, critical-thinking skills, experience, and basic concepts of pathophysiology to case studies/activities.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HIM 214 - Health Information Technology


    This course provides the framework for all stages of the management of health information technologies. As health information systems have become increasingly integral to the provision of quality healthcare services, the need for cohesive, effective health information systems has become critical. Students will learn the fundamentals of health records, including the required content, rules and regulations regarding maintenance of the records, as well as the basics of how to plan, design, and implement systems to meet this need.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HIM 100 and HA 205

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final exam

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    1. Understand the fundamentals and contents of health records, the genesis from paper to electronic records and the basics of health information systems.
    2. Recognize the fundamentals of healthcare data analytics.
    3. Understand how information systems are part of an organization’s overall strategy.
    4. Define the terms medical record, electronic health record (EHR), electronic medical record (EMR), and personal health record (PHR).
    5. For each term in the preceding objective, define their attributes, functionality, and basic operational standards.
    6. Describe the consumer’s empowerment impact on PHRs and their role in value-drive healthcare initiatives.
    7. Discuss the current state of PHR utilization.
    8. Identify the policies and practices that may aid in overcoming barriers and enabling adoption of PHRs.
    9. Explain the role of the HIM professional in maintaining the privacy and confidentiality of PHRs.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HIM 250 - ICD Coding


    Discusses the historical perspective of ICD-10-CM as well as the ICD-10-CM coding conventions and highlights from the Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting. This course will utilize the draft ICD-10-CM manual to illustrate important highlights of chapter specific coding under ICD-10.  The course also discusses the ICD-10-PCS guidelines so students can apply any applicable rules for procedure code assignment, including correct code assignment for multiple procedures, approach procedures and inspection procedures. The student will also learn to categorize procedures by root operation and master the use of ICD-10-PCS tables.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HIM 200, HIM 210, HIM 211, and HIM 212 or their equivalents.

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course you will be able to:

    1. Identify the benefits of transitioning to ICD-10
    2. Explain key features of ICD-10-CM coding conventions
    3. Accurately apply ICD-10-CM codes from Chapters 1 through Chapter 21
    4. Recognize key features of each of the ICD-10-PCS sections
    5. Identify the historical perspective and benefits of ICD-10-PCS
    6. Explain key features of ICD-10-PCS Coding Guidelines
    7. Master the ICD-10-PCS root operations


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HIM 260 - CPT Coding


    Provides health information management students with the basic knowledge they need to recognize and assign CPT codes to real-world cases.  Students will also gain an understanding of why CPT codes are an important aspect of billing for healthcare services and reimbursement for services provided.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Anatomy & Physiology, HA 205, HIM 210, HIM 211, HIM 212

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, students should be able to demonstrate competencies at the appropriate skill and knowledge level:

    • Apply CPT coding conventions and national CPT guidelines to correctly assign procedures and services codes to operative reports, clinic notes, and other medical record documentation, achieving at least 90% accuracy rate.
    • Demonstrate ability to correctly sequence CPT codes according to federal, AMA, and other applicable coding and billing guidelines.
    • Understand the differences between billing for physician professional services and facility services when assigning CPT codes.
    • Utilize important medical and CPT coding references.
    • Describe the concept of medical necessity and the importance of the link between ICD-9-CM and CPT in coding patient records.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of HCPCS Level II basics.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of Ambulatory Payment Classifications (APCs) and the differences between coding for physicians (professional fee coding) and hospital outpatients (facility coding).

     

    Credits: 3


  •  

    HIM 300 - Health Data Management


    Provides an understanding of health data structure, content, and acquisition. It is also defines health care information systems, requirements and standards, and integrates an overview of how clinical classification systems are used in health care delivery and reimbursement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205, HIM 100, HIM 214, HIM 250 and HIM 260

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of the course, you should be able to do the following:

    1. Evaluate, implement and manage electronic applications/systems for clinical classification and coding
    2. Identify the functions and relationships between healthcare classification systems
    3. Map terminologies, vocabularies, and classification systems.
    4. Evaluate the accuracy of diagnostic and procedural coding.
    5. Verify that documentation in the health record supports the diagnosis and reflects the patient’s progress, clinical findings, and discharge status.
    6. Compile organization-wide health record documentation guidelines.
    7. Interpret health information standards.
    8. Format data to satisfy integration needs.
    9. Construct and maintain the standardization of data dictionaries to meet the needs of the enterprise.
    10. Demonstrate compliance with internal and external data dictionary requirements.
    11. Advocate information operability and information exchange
    12. Analyze information needs of customers across the healthcare continuum.
    13. Evaluate health information systems and data storage design.
    14. Manage clinical indices, databases, and registries.
    15. Apply knowledge of database architecture and design to meet organizational needs.
    16. Evaluate data from varying sources to create meaningful presentations.
    17. Validate data from secondary sources to include in the patient’s record, including personal health records.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HIM 320 - Reimbursement Methodologies


    Provides an understanding of the fundamental reimbursement concepts and methods of health care systems and describes the role of the manager, health information manager, and personnel.  Strategies for compliance are examined, as well as charge master management, case mix management, payment systems, a variety of payment or insurance plans, as well as the revenue cycle process.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HIM 214, HIM 250, HIM 260, and HIM 330

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    1.      Manage the use of clinical data that is required in prospective payment systems (PPS) in healthcare delivery.

    2.      Manage the use of clinical data that is required in other reimbursement systems in healthcare delivery.

    3.      Participate in the selection and development of applications and processes for chargemaster and claims management.

    4.      Implement and manage processes for compliance and reporting.

    5.      Participate in revenue cycle management.

    Credits: 3


  •  

    HIM 340 - HIM Strategies


    Provides an overview of the technology used to facilitate communication and manage information in health care organizations for the purpose of data collection, storage, analysis, and retrieval of information. You will study the design and implementation of electronic health records, personal health records, and other health care administrative applications, as well as the risks and benefits of integrated health information networks. You will also be able to describe the use of standards to achieve interoperability of health care records. This course is intended to meet the CAHIIM competencies/knowledge clusters of Domains IV.A through IV.C.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205, HIM 100, HIM 214, HIM 330, HIM 320

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final exam

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Implement and manage the use of technology, including hardware and software to ensure data collection, storage, analysis, and reporting of information.
    • Contribute to the development of networks, including Intranet and Internet applications to facilitate the electronic health record (EHR), personal health record (PHR), public health, and other administrative applications.
    • Interpret the use of standards to achieve interoperability of health care information systems.

     

    Credits: 3


  •  

    HIM 402 - Project and Operations Management


    Provides an overview of management principles relevant to the provision of health information services, as well as project management principles, and techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HIM 214, HIM 250, HIM 260, HIM 330, HIM 320, and HIM 340

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Discuss the professional code of ethics and what the HIM Code of Ethics means.  
    • Analyze how and what type of data are captured and structured at an organizational level and for a health system.
    • Construct a health information management system that effectively manages the methods of capturing, maintaining, and evaluating the quality of health information.
    • Develop standard practices, policies, and procedures that support effective and efficient capture, maintenance, and quality of data.
    • Support patient quality of care through documentation in the health record supports the overall continuum of care for the patient, including secondary data sources such as registries, databases, data sets, surreys, and core measures in the traditional acute care setting, outpatient, and e-delivery.  
    • Create clinical documentation programs that improve documentation in the health record supports the diagnosis and reflects the patient’s progress, clinical findings, and discharge status
    • Construct a data set for hospital scenarios that incorporate HEDIS, UHDDS, and OASIS are used to support data capture, maintenance, and quality of healthcare data
    • Audit records for compliance with and report findings to Corporate Compliance on the content of the health record
    • Formulate the structure of a 21st century state of the art HIM department that addresses workflow, space and equipment, aesthetics, and ergonomics factor into the functionality of a work environment and methods for distributing work assignments and projects.
    • Breakdown and organize the differences in all of the working parts of Revenue Cycle Management for commercial, managed care, and federal insurance plans.
    • Explain the accreditation standards as they relate to Health Information Management for organizations such as, but not limited to, Joint Commission, NCQA, CARF, CHAP, URAC, and ACHC.  
    • Evaluate and interpret the regulatory and licensure requirements for local, state, and federal agencies as they relate to Health Information Management.  
    • Interpret the federal initiatives such as ONC, CCHIT, Red Flag Rules, and Meaningful Use  
    • Evaluate and interpret the Health Information state and federal laws, regulations, and standards such as HIPAA, and HITECH along with accrediting bodies such as the Joint Commission, CHAP, and ACHC.  
    • Evaluate and interpret the accreditation and licensing process for the Joint Commission, Medicare, and State Regulators to select the appropriate items for a comprehensive checklist for the Health Information Department.  


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HIM 403 - Healthcare Statistics & Research


    This course provides an understanding of the analysis and effective presentation of data in a healthcare system to inform decision-making and system operations

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HIM 214, HIM 250, HIM 260, HIM 300, HIM 320, HIM 340, and HIM 402

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons/assignments

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    1. Apply analytical results to facilitate decision-making.
    2. Apply data extraction methodologies.
    3. Recommend organizational action based on knowledge obtained from data exploration and mining.
    4. Analyze clinical data to identify trends that demonstrate quality, safety, and effectiveness of healthcare.
    5. Apply knowledge of database querying and data exploration and mining techniques to facilitate information retrieval.
    6. Evaluate administrative reports using appropriate software.
    7. Interpret inferential statistics.
    8. Analyze statistical data for decision-making.
    9. Apply principles of research and clinical literature evaluation to improve outcomes.
    10. Plan adherence to Institutional Review Board (IRB) processes and policies.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    HIM 453 - Compliance, Ethics, and Information Protection


    Provides students with the foundation they need to ensure compliance with federal and state regulations for protecting protected health information, as well as to understand the legal and ethical issues related to the provision of healthcare services and the management of health information.  The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) Code of Ethics and Coding Ethics provide the framework for this course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 410, HIM 402, HIM 403

    Assignment Overview
    12 lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Identify laws and regulations applicable to health related information management.
    • Apply legal concepts and principles to the practice of health information management.
    • Analyze privacy, security, and confidentiality policies and procedures for internal and external use, including the exchange of health information.
    • Recommend elements included in the design of audit trails and a data quality monitoring program.
    • Collaborate in the design and implementation of risk assessment, contingency planning, and data recovery procedures.
    • Analyze the security and privacy implications of mobile health technologies.
    • Develop employee educational programs in privacy, security, and confidentiality.
    • Create policies and procedures to manage access and disclosure of personal health information.
    • Protect electronic health information through confidentiality and security measures, policies and procedures.
    • Appraise current laws and standards related to health information initiatives.
    • Determine processes for compliance with current laws and standards related to health information initiatives and revenue.
    • Construct and maintain processes, policies, and procedures to ensure the accuracy of coded data based on established guidelines.
    • Manage coding audits.
    • Identify severity of illness and its impact on healthcare payment systems.
    • Determine policies and procedures to monitor for trends in abuse or fraud.
    • Implement provider querying techniques to resolve coding discrepancies.
    • Create methods to manage Present on Admission, hospital acquired conditions, and other CDI components.

     

    Credits: 3


  •  

    HIM 460 - Advanced Practicum


    Strengthens the academic experience of health information management (HIM) students by providing the opportunity to apply what they have learned throughout their educational program. The advanced practicum requires students to demonstrate competence in the five primary domains established in the industry.  The student spends 120 hours doing this professional practice experience, 60 of which are done at a health care site, with the remaining hours done in virtual lab.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All required HIM courses

    Assignment Overview
    In conjunction with their instructor and/or site manager, students will cover the AHIMA Domains of Practice areas.The student should, through a combination of observation and participation, become familiar with all aspects of each activity area, including its purpose, the services it provides, and any problem areas.  The site manager will identify on the Professional Practice Experience (PPE) Checklist the areas the student has completed.  The student will provide at least monthly progress reports to the instructor and the final grade will be based on successful completion of  the PPE Checklist.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, students will:

    1. Demonstrate competence in health data management,
    2. Exhibit understanding of health statistics, research and quality management,
    3. Utilize privacy, confidentiality and legal principles of HIM in a health care organization,
    4. Apply policies and procedures related to HIM, and
    5. Maintain patient information and respond to requests for information, as well as assuring data integrity.
    6. Develop management skills.
    7. Understand informatics.
    8. Synthesize AHIMA competencies
    9. Prepare student for the RHIA credential exam. 

     

    Credits: 3 Offered: Online and at a professional practice site


  •  

    LTC 210 - Introduction to Long-Term Care Administration


    Introduces students to the field of long-term care administration. It covers the state of the field, those it serves, and the various organizations who serve them. It also examines issues affecting all long-term care providers, individually or collectively (e.g., financing, regulations, integration, ethical issues), discusses how the various segments of long-term care fit together to form an overall system, and looks at trends likely to shape the field in the future. There is a focus on administration within the long-term care system and the skills managers need to survive and prosper.

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Describe the current long-term care system in the United States and how it came to be, as well as how it differs from the ideal system. 
    • Identify the characteristics of the ideal long-term care system, and compare and contrast it with the current system. 
    • Describe the ways in which the providers of long-term care services interact with each other and with other components of the long-term care system, that is, consumers, payers, and regulators. 
    • Identify and discuss the management/ leadership skills needed for success in long-term care administration. 
    • Discuss the trends affecting the long-term care system today, those likely to shape its future, and how managers will need to behave in order to improve the overall long-term care system.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    LTC 310 - Aging in America


    Presents concepts related to physiological, psychological, and social factors important in the aging process and their implications for health services. Includes an in-depth exploration of the social, political, economic, and ethical parameters of alternative approaches to services delivery.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
     

    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • View aging as a biopsychosocial process rather than a simple event and understand self, family, colleagues, and clients as aging individuals.
    • Differentiate between normal changes of aging and illness states common in aging individuals.
    • Apply major theories of aging from biology, psychology, and sociology to interpret how people age in United States society.
    •  Identify societal, community, and health care resources for positive and successful aging.
    • Identify some of the political, social, and economic issues important to health care systems as they deal with the needs of aging clients.
    • Recognize the wide range of existing alternatives for delivery of health care to aging people and identify opportunities for development of additional services based on identified needs and societal trends.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    LTC 350 - Aging, Spirituality and Senior Health Care


    Grounded in a Judeo-Christian foundation, this course provides a medical humanities perspective on aging. We will explore writings and research on aging, spirituality, and senior health care, written from diverse disciplines and faith backgrounds - theologians, medical ethicists, pastoral counselors, parish nurses, chaplains, geriatric social workers, psychologists, gerontologists, as well as health and long-term care professionals. Based upon a life-span developmental model, we will apply an exploration of the aging process that is both integrative and inter-disciplinary when working with older adults in a variety of settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     None

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe key demographic characteristics of Older Adults which may impact the field of Senior Healthcare.
    • Identify ways in which one’s spirituality (or, faith beliefs) may influence health behaviors and health outcomes.
    • Recognize the biological, sociological, psychological, and spiritual dimensions of aging.
    • Identify important cultural competencies needed to serve elder health consumers of diverse racial-ethnic backgrounds.
    • Understand the spiritual challenges and opportunities of aging.
    • Respectfully integrate interfaith and cross-cultural views of seniors and caregivers.
    • Assess the impact of changes in the family life cycle and structure upon informal and formal care giving.
    • Describe key elements of a Spiritual History and a Spiritual Care Program for Older Adults.
    • Understand ethical issues that surround end-of-life care.
    • Apply the principles of the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Healthcare Services to senior care.
    • Identify ways in which senior healthcare systems may also serve as spiritual care communities.
    • Write a research paper on a selected topic with relevance to aging, spirituality, and senior healthcare.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    LTC 352 - Long-Term Care Laws and Regulations


    Acquaints students with the current state of long-term care regulations as well as the dynamics behind them. It specifically addresses the OBRA (Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act) regulations, which require major changes in the way in which long-term care is delivered. It requires students to demonstrate familiarity with state and local statutes and regulations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210

    Assignment Overview
    12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Differentiate between the organizational structures within government branches and their respective roles in the formation of Long-Term Care Rules and Regulations. 
    • Appraise and implement a practical Resident Bill of Rights In-Service Plan for employees and residents. 
    • Demonstrate understanding of survey processes and protocols in long-term care, including the submission of acceptable plans of corrections to regulatory agencies. 
    • Understand key components of a HIPAA Privacy and Security program to ensure resident confidentiality.
    • Differentiate between powers of attorney, guardianship. and conservatorship.
    • Implement workplace controls to reduce or eliminate the risks of occupational hazards.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    LTC 448 - Issues in Long-Term Care Policy


    Addresses issues in long-term care, particularly issues affecting how long-term care policy is developed and implemented. Those issues include how the long-term care system should be structured, who should control it, how to assure access to all who need long-term care, and the ever-present question of how it should be financed. It builds on earlier courses that examined the overall field of long-term care and the components of the system as it exists. Students in this course look beyond what is and question why it is as it is, and how it might be improved.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HA 205 or LTC 210

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Understand the forces causing changes to the long-term care system
    • Discuss the continuum of care as a basis for developing policy.
    • Have knowledge of the policies, regulation, and quality concerns and their effects on long-term care operations and systems.
    • Identify the ethical issues impacting the elderly and how services are provided.
    • Recognize the potential future trends and changes in long-term care delivery, payment and access.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    LTC 450 - Nursing Home Administration


    Designed to help students apply the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier courses to the specific field of nursing home administration. It covers such topics as operational management, finance, human resources, residential care, and environmental management, dealing with those subjects in the context of nursing home administration. It is designed to assist students in passing the national examination required by all 50 states for licensure as a nursing home administrator.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All required core courses must be completed before enrolling in this course, unless specifically approved by the designated Faculty Mentor or Program Director.

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Explain the nature of the nursing home environment and its unique requirements for administration.
    • Determine how to apply the philosophies, theories, principles, and concepts of management to nursing home settings.
    • Analyze the nature of the interactions among the various segments of the nursing home organization.
    • Clarify the appropriate roles of customers in the long-term care system and the role of the nursing home administrator in meeting the needs of those customers.
    • Locate and review the legal and regulatory requirements and their impact on administration of a nursing home organization.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    LTC 456 - Assisted Living Administration


    A combination of housing and personalized health care provided in a group living environment for those who need help with activities of daily living. Care is provided in a way that promotes maximum independence and dignity. This course provides the student with an understanding of assisted living and the essential elements involved in the operation of an assisted living facility. It teaches students how to adapt more traditional long-term care management skills to meet the special needs of assisted living management. It explores the most innovative design models and management methods being utilized as this exciting new field continues to evolve.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All required core courses must be completed before enrolling in this course, unless specifically approved by the designated Faculty Mentor or Program Director. 

    Assignment Overview
    Term-based with 12 weekly lessons and a final

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course you should be prepared for leadership in an assisted living environment, as evidenced by:

    • Understanding the evolving nature of assisted living.
    • Managing staffing to provide quality services in a financially and legally responsible manner.
    • Grasping concepts of financial management in the assisted-living environment.
    • Maintaining a physical environment that is safe and appropriate for residents and staff.
    • Articulating the physical and psychosocial needs of assisted-living residents.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    LTC 461 - Practicum in Assisted Living Administration


    The course requires the student to develop a program for familiarization with assisted living organizations; to spend time with, or otherwise become knowledgeable about, the functional areas or departments of the organization and to complete several assignments relating to that experience. Content areas covered include: Resident/Patient Care and Quality of Life, Human Resources, Finance, Physical Environment & Atmosphere and Leadership and Management.  The length of the internship period will be 520 hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prior to enrolling in LTC 461, the student must have approval from the Long-Term Care Administration Program Manager.

    Assignment Overview
    The written assignments for this course, since it is a practicum, consist of the reports sent to the instructor by the student. Only the monthly progress reports and the project paper will carry grades. Other reports are required for completion of the course, but will not be graded.

    Course Learning Objectives
    The objectives of this practicum are:

    1. To provide a planned, progressively comprehensive, supervised training program, combining academic learning with practical experience.
    2. To introduce the student to a dimension of health care management that will expand his or her knowledge base.
    3. To require the student to apply management principles learned in class to real life situations and problems.
    4. To provide an opportunity for interaction between the student and health care professionals, and to instill in the student an appreciation of professional attitudes and values.
    5. To reinforce in the student a sense of responsibility toward the profession of health care management, colleagues, resident/patients or clients, and the community.
    6. To allow the student an opportunity to assume administrative responsibility.
    7. To develop the student’s communication skills through written reports (including the Project Paper), and through interactions such as meetings and presentations.
    8. To engage the student in a participatory learning experience that will benefit the organization providing the field experience.
    9. To develop a confident, professional administrator, possessing the necessary skills and expertise.
    10. To assist the student in preparation for any required licensure exams.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    LTC 462 - Practicum in Health Service Admin


    This course requires the student to develop a program for familiarization with long-term care and other health care organizations; to spend time with, or otherwise become knowledgeable about, the functional areas or departments of the organization and to complete several assignments relating to that experience. The experience will encompass organizations across the long-term care spectrum.  Content areas covered include: Resident/Patient Care and Quality of Life, Human Resources, Finance, Physical Environment & Atmosphere and Leadership and Management.  The length of the internship period may vary, but follows the same guidelines and includes the same type of assignments.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All required core courses. Must be taken either with or following LTC 450.  Requires Program Manager or Program Director approval.

    Assignment Overview
    An internship with monthly reports and an applied research paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate leadership skills in the following:

    • To provide a planned, progressively comprehensive, supervised training program, combining academic learning with practical experience. 
    • To introduce the intern to a dimension of health care management that will expand his or her knowledge base. 
    • To require the intern to apply management principles learned in class to real-life situations and problems. 
    • To provide an opportunity for interaction between the intern and health care professionals, and to instill in the intern an appreciation of professional attitudes and values. 
    • To reinforce, in the intern, a sense of responsibility toward the profession of health care management, colleagues, resident/patients or clients, and the community. 
    • To allow the intern an opportunity to assume administrative responsibility. 
    • To develop the intern’s communication skills through written reports (including the Project Paper), and through interactions such as meetings and presentations. 
    • To engage the intern in a participatory learning experience that will benefit the organization providing the field experience. 
    • To develop a confident, professional administrator, possessing the necessary skills and expertise. 
    • To assist the intern in preparation for any required licensure exams.


    Credits: 3 Offered: Monthly

  •  

    RS 460 - Senior Project


    Requires students to complete an approved work-related independent study project and write a paper based on it. It involves problem-solving, communication, and critical thinking skills that have been acquired in previous courses and the application of these skills to a specific project that is of personal interest to the student and of value to the profession of radiologic science. Student has 15 weeks to complete the course. Successfully passing this course is a requirement for graduating.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All other courses required for completion of the BSRSA degree must be completed before taking this course.  This is the capstone course.

    Assignment Overview
    This course requires students to submit five units, with the last unit being the final project on which the course grade will be based.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should have the following:

    • Developed problem-solving, oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills.
    • A deeper understanding and knowledge of the subject matter.
    • Completed a project that is of value to you and the field of radiologic technology.
    • Acquire social interactive skills and role learning.


    Credits: 3
  • Information Technology

    Courses

  •  

    IT 100 - Information Technology Fundamentals


    This course provides a broad introduction to the concepts, tools, and applications used in information technology. Students will learn programming, networking, computer organization and software development. They will explore information assurance and security management, business systems and basic systems analysis.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    English Composition

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 6 Units

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Explain the fundamental concepts of Information Technology including hardware and software.
    • Demonstrate the basic ability in using desktop and web 2.0 productivity applications effectively as tools for writing, analyzing, problem solving and presenting information.
    • Explain the basic concepts of Operating Systems, Databases and Networks.
    • Relate the importance of Security and the basics of security that should be applied to protect the data.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IT 105 - Technical Mathematics


    This course provides a broad introduction to the mathematical foundations for information technology. Students will utilize basic algebra skills to solve simple equations, inequalities and formulas, calculate ratios, rates, and proportions. Students will solve graphic equations and use binary and hexadecimal number systems, as well as apply simple logic.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments:  6 Units

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Demonstrate skills in basic algebra
    • Solve simple equations, inequalities and formulas
    • Calculate ratios, rates, and proportions
    • Utilize binary and hexadecimal number systems
    • Solve graphic equations
    • Apply simple logic


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IT 110 - IT Ethics, Audit, and Compliance


    This course explores basic ethical principles, ethical decision-making, and the practical application of ethics in relation to information technology today.   Students will learn about web technologies, intellectual property, cybercrime, file-sharing, security risks, identity theft, employee surveillance, privacy and compliance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    English Composition

    Assignment Overview
    Synchronous term-based course with ten weekly assignments and a final project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Explain the importance of ethics in Information Technology
    • Describe IT malpractice, licensing and an IT professional code of conduct.
    • Identify why computer attacks and crime are prevalent, types of attacks and crime, federal laws on computer attacks and crime.
    • Differentiate the types of computer crime and attacks, their risks and detection.
    • Explain the importance of quality software engineering and development in reducing the risk of computer attacks.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IT 115 - Computer Networking - Network+ Certification Prep Course


    CompTIA Network+ is a vendor neutral networking certification that is highly trusted around the globe.  This course covers the essential knowledge and skills required to confidently design, configure, manage and troubleshoot any wired and wireless networking device.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    1. Understand the basic components associated with networks and telecommunications
    2. Learn the fundamentals of network and telecommunication technologies
    3. Understand the fundamentals of information-based strategies using networks and telecommunications and related applications
    4. Gain enough practical experience in designing, installing and managing networked systems to be able to install and manage a small network
    5. Understand the value and opportunities for organizational advantages from networks, communications, and related applications
    6. Understand the legal, social, and ethical issues associated with networks and telecommunications
    7. Appreciate some of the values and techniques that may become available from technology convergence and new standards or conventions.  Conversely, to appreciate how information technology and networking may combine to become irrelevant in some organizations
    8. Comprehend the preparations needed to protect an organization from threats and risks related to failures, security, disasters, and crises.


    Credits: 3 credits / Can also be taken as a non-credit course (IT 015)
  •  

    IT 210 - Networking


    This course introduces the basic concepts, terminology, and design revolving around network technology. Students will become familiar with network technology, open systems interconnection (OSI) model, local area networks (LANs), metropolitan area networks (MANs), wide area networks (WANs), network devices, network wiring standards, networking terminology, design and connectivity.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    IT 100

    Assignment Overview
    Synchronous term-based course with ten weekly assignments and a final project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Utilize networking terminology, networking devices and media.
    • Describe Local Area Networks (LANs), Wide Area Networks (WANs), and Metropolitan Area Networks (MANs).
    • Apply networking standards such as the Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) model.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of networking protocols, such as TCP/IP.
    • Use various software tools/commands to view/set network configuration settings.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IT 216 - Certified Information Systems Security (CISSP) Prep Course


    This course prepares students to sit for and pass the vendor neutral certified information systems security professional (CISSP) certification exam. This course provides a more in-depth look into the techniques, processes, and implementation behind strong cybersecurity. Students will learn general security, network security, operating system security, methods for testing security, IP security, wireless security, how to use firewalls and gateways, guard against hackers and viruses, build authentication skills, and encryption techniques

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

     

    1.        Explain how to build secure systems that can prevent and detect intrusions.

    2.        Demonstrate how to protect mission-critical systems.

    3.        Deploy policy driven security systems.

    4.        Explain how to select and implement the best encryption methodologies that meet the organization’s needs.

    5.        Explain Physical, Operational, Network and Storage security.

    6.        Describe the risk, legal, and regulations related impacts to the I.T. and Security function and how to stay compliant.

     

    Credits: 3 credits / Can also be taken as a non-credit course (IT 016)


  •  

    IT 220 - Operating Systems


    This course analyzes the fundamental ideas, structures, and design objectives of current operating systems. Students will explore I/O management, memory management, multiprogramming, linking loaders, real and virtual systems, batch and time sharing, concurrent processes , process synchronization, deadlocks,  CPU scheduling, secondary storage, file structures, and distributed systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    IT 100

    Assignment Overview
    Synchronous term-based course with ten weekly assignments and a final project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Relate history of operating systems (OS)
    • Install and Configure OS (client and server)
    • Apply best practices in maintenance of OS
    • Identify troubleshooting strategies for specific network problems
    • Identify security issues in OS


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IT 230 - Programming I


    This course introduces the main concepts of programming logic and equips students with the tools necessary to design and document program specifications. Students will learn interactive coding techniques, algorithm design/development, program constants, program variables, control structures, functions, procedures, logic, code control, error trapping, error handling, flowchart /structure chart design, and pseudo code.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    IT 100 and IT 105

    Accelerated 6 week online summer session course. Prerequisites waived if student shows competency in: 1) internet usage and 2) downloading and saving files.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 6 Units

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Introduce the concept of structured programing and the syntax of programming.
    • Use identifiers to name variables, constants and methods. 
    • Identify syntax errors, runtime errors and logical errors.
    • Declare, initialize and access elements in arrays.
    • Utilize methods, loop structures, iteration and selection. 
    • Use operators to write expressions.
    • Name variables, constants and methods.


    Credits: 3 Offered: Online; Accelerated Online Summer 2017

  •  

    IT 240 - Database I


    This course discusses the basic design, implementation, and management of database systems. Students will learn data models, modeling tools and techniques, approaches to structural and object design, models for databases (relational, hierarchical, networked and object-oriented designs), CASE tools, data dictionaries, repositories and warehouses, Windows/GUI coding and/or implementation, code and application generation, client-server planning, testing and installation, system conversion, end-user training, integration, post-implementation review, and sorting and querying.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    IT 100

    Assignment Overview
    Synchronous term-based course with ten weekly assignments and a final project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Explain the concepts of Database Management Systems.
    • Develop logical database models and convert logical database models into physical databases.
    • Explain the concepts and tools needed to perform data analysis and create data models.
    • Construct Entity-Relationship diagrams (ERDs).
    • Design, normalize and administer databases.
    • Demonstrate the ability to create databases and database objects.
    • Demonstrate the ability to perform insert, update, delete and data retrieval functions in a relational database.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IT 250 - Security I


    This course covers the essential principles of information security and incorporates activities, methods, and procedures to help reach secure solutions. Students will learn mandatory access control, discretionary access control, integrity, availability, confidentiality, inspection and protection of information assets, detection of and reaction to threats to information assets, examination of pre-and post-incident procedures, technical and managerial responses, identify threats, vulnerabilities, and controls, encryption, code, security management, and law, privacy and ethics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    IT 100

    IT 110

    Assignment Overview
    Synchronous term-based course with ten weekly assignments and a final project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the history, characteristics and components of information security.
    • Identify and prioritize information assets and threats to those assets.
    • Define an information security strategy and architecture, including disaster recovery planning.
    • Identify, plan for and respond to intruders in an information system.
    • Identify various industry standards and organizations in the security field.
    • Describe legal, ethical and public relations implications of security and privacy issues.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    IT 310 - Server Administration


    This course equips students with the knowledge and ability to install, configure, manage, and sustain particular servers. Students will explore virtual machines, integrated services, cluster fail-over, load balancing, RAID, IIS, SMTP, SAN, SSL, file and print services, network services and access, network policy server infrastructure, password authentication, PHP scripting, and administering user accounts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    IT 100, IT 210, IT 220

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments:  6 units

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Plan and Implement configuration of Server services (DNS, DHCP).
    • Implement Active Directory structure and organization.
    • Implement Group policy.
    • Configure File server.
    • Monitor Server Health.
    • Apply best practices in maintenance of Server.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IT 330 - Programming II


    This course provides a more in-depth look into programming techniques, tools, and structures. Students will learn design patterns, data abstraction, inheritance, polymorphism, data structures, algorithms, recursion,  software development life cycle, logic design, flow control structures, subroutines, File input/outputs, object-oriented programming (OOP) concepts, Graphic User Interface (GUI) classes, over-loading, and inheritance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    IT 100 and IT 230

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview

    Assignments: 6 Units

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Define object oriented programming (OOP) terminology.
    • Apply object oriented programming concepts into a software design project.
    • Define and manipulate classes and objects.
    • Construct a software program that utilizes OOP concepts using an integrated development environment.
    • Build a software program that utilizes a graphical user interface.
    • List and manipulate complex data structures and algorithms.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    IT 340 - Database Administration


    This course focuses of the various tasks, tools, responsibilities, and best practices involved in database administration. Students will learn disaster recovery, performance analysis and tuning, data dictionary maintenance, data modeling and optimization, database and user management, installation, performance monitoring, creation of users and user privileges, backup and recovery, views, partitions, advanced queries, stored procedures, transaction processing, data integrity techniques, advanced modeling and design concepts, implementing a security system, and troubleshooting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    IT 100 and IT 240

    Assignment Overview
    Synchronous term-based course with ten weekly assignments and a final project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe the storage, hardware and memory components of a DBMS architecture.
    • Explain and demonstrate system, application and database performance tuning.
    • Explain various backup types and how to apply various backups to reduce the risk of data loss. 
    • Demonstrate the steps required to restore a database from different backup types.
    • Apply best practices to database reorganization and defragmentation.
    • Identify database security basics and demonstrate the ability to issue Data Control Language (DCL) statements to ensure database security. 


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IT 350 - Security II


    This course provides a more in-depth look into the techniques, processes, and implementation behind strong cybersecurity. Students will learn general security, network security, operating system security, methods for testing security, IP security, wireless security, how to use firewalls and gateways, guard against hackers and viruses, build authentication skills, and encryption techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    IT 100 and IT 250

    Assignment Overview
    Synchronous term-based course with ten weekly assignments and a final project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe the general concepts of Information security.
    • Identify various security measures that can be applied at different levels (OS level, DB level, Network level, etc.) to protect the systems and data.
    • Explain various cryptographic methods, encryption systems and implementations.
    • Identify emerging security products and solutions and their application and benefits.
    • Discuss the changing threat landscape and the measures to keep up with the bad guys.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IT 400 - Programming III


    This course takes an advanced look into programming practices and applications through the use of effective software. Students will learn dynamic Internet scripting, standard library packages, AJAX interface elements, dynamic scripting algorithms, decomposition, encapsulation, procedural abstraction, testing, software reuse, Microsoft Visual Studio Integrated development environment (IDE), the C# language syntax, debugger tools, Arrays, lists and queues, Remote Data Objects (RDO), Active Data Objects (ADO), structured query language (SQL), and how to combine SQL with Visual Basic.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    IT 100, IT 230, and IT 330

    Assignment Overview
    Synchronous term-based course with ten weekly assignments and a final project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Operate an integrated development environment to create rich Internet applications.
    • Build a relational database using structure query language (SQL).
    • Construct connection strings to access local and remote databases using Microsoft Remote Data Object (RDO) and Active Data Object (ADO) libraries.
    • Construct and validate web pages that use web design best practices.
    • Generate dynamic web content that recognizes and responds to the state of the web browser and user inputs.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IT 401 - Special Topics


    Surveys contemporary topics and issues of significance to information technology. Potential topics may include issues related to database, operating systems, networking, programming, and/or security.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All 100, 200, and 300 level IT courses

    Assignment Overview
    Synchronous term-based course with ten weekly assignments and a final project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Apply the principles learned in this course to current topics and trends in the field.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    IT 460 - Internship


    Designed for students to gain practical information technology experience in a local business. The course requires the student to develop a program for familiarization with information technology in a real business setting; to spend time with, or otherwise become knowledgeable about, the functional areas of information technology and to complete several assignments relating to that experience. Content areas covered include: Operating systems, Programming, Security, Database Management, and Server Administration. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All other required IT courses

    Assignment Overview
    In this course the student works directly with the instructor and a site mentor to ensure the student achieves all of the objectives for the internship

    Course Learning Objectives
    Demonstrate understanding of the primary areas of information technology in a field experience.

    Credits: 3
  • Interdisciplinary Studies

    Courses

  •  

    AC 210 - Financial Accounting


    This is the first accounting course for non-business and business students alike. Covers the complete accounting sequence through preparation of financial statements as applied to various forms of business organization. No prior knowledge of business or bookkeeping is needed for this course.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units/15 Lessons

    Interactivity: None

    Final Assessment: Non-Proctored Final Exam

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Examine the information being presented by the income statement and balance sheet.
    • Describe the monthly accounting cycle, its adjustments, and its results.
    • Define what is meant by “profit” and “loss” and how they may be influenced by the choice of accounting methods.
    • Describe the effect economic stimulus and taxation policies (at the federal level) have on accounting choices.
    • Read and interpret the annual report of a corporation.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    AC 211 - Managerial Accounting


    Stresses the uses of accounting information for corporations. It includes product and process costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, responsibility accounting, cost behavior analysis, and understanding the necessity for accounting controls, as well as the essential part that accounting plays in management decision-making.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AC 210

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: None

    Final Assessment: Non-Proctored Final Exam

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Differentiate between management and financial accounting.
    • Demonstrate cost principles and the proper financial statement classification and reporting of costs by various types of companies.
    • Explain cost components and their relationship to changes in volume and other factors.
    • Develop a comprehensive financial budget.
    • Analyze budget variances.
    • Evaluate long-term capital investment decisions.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    AT 106 - Art in the Modern World


    Looks at Nineteenth-Century Romanticism and the surfacing of Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism, which paved the way for the major art movements of the twentieth century: Expressionism, Art Nouveau, Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Art, Op and Pop Art, and the New Realism of the mid-twentieth century.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Research Paper


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    •  Recognize the origins of modern and contemporary art.
    • Explore the role of the artist and critic in a particular society and culture.
    •  Identify painting, sculpture, architecture, and photography of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
    •  Recognize the influences of social conditions on modern art and analyze works of art from their historical and cultural perspective.
    • Critique a work of art using the four-steps of the Critical Process (Describe, Analyze, Interpret, Judge).
    • Incorporate your own Intuitive response with Aesthetic theories to express sophisticated ideas and pose insightful questions about contexts, processes, and criteria when evaluating art.
    • Evaluate and critique original works of art in a museum or gallery setting.
    • Interpret and evaluate the impact of visual arts in contemporary society and culture.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    AT 108 - Music Appreciation


    Music Appreciation is a non-technical course designed with the listener in mind. The course guides students in approaching classical music of the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries. Topics include diversity of musical forms, historical backgrounds, composer biographies, and selected musical examples. The course culminates in each student’s attendance and review of a live Symphony Orchestra performance.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: None
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Identify the elements and vocabulary of music for mastery of discussion of music of all styles.
    • Make judgments and critical observations about musical works based on the elements and concepts of music: pitch, melody, rhythm, timbre, harmony, musical texture, musical form, notation, tempos and dynamics.
    •  Identify various musical instruments and ensembles: strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion and vocal.
    • Articulate basic understanding of the historical periods of music, including the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, and Romantic.
    • Describe the role of music within historical, artistic, and cultural traditions.
    • Recognize the styles of each of the historical periods by aurally identifying standard masterpieces.
    • Be familiar with technical aspects of selected pieces: orchestration, instrumentation, form and musical texture.
    • Appreciate the creative process of music by demonstrating familiarity of the lives and styles of individual composers.
    • Describe and explain performance practice: playing, singing, and conducting.
    • Develop skills of aesthetic judgment and critical thinking through music listening in-class and at scheduled live performances.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    BA 111 - The Effective Communicator


    This course is designed for the learner who is both practical and forward-looking. We will focus on the real situations in which business communication takes place, with attention to observation, analysis, and the “how-to” of effective workplace communication. We will also discuss a variety of strategies for enhancing one’s immediate effectiveness, with an eye on how the development of communication skills forms an integral part of building one’s career.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EH 106 or equivalent is required. EH 107 or equivalent is recommended.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: None
     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of the course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Apply to your business activities a clear and practical understanding of effective ways to communicate.
    • Learn and use the tools of business writing for immediate results and for career enhancement.
    • Develop and practice the skills of meeting management and business presentations.
    • Create and maintain a strategic approach to managing one’s own workplace-communication activities.

     

     

    Credits: 3


  •  

    BA 201 - Introduction to Microeconomics


    An examination of the market structures of pure competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, and monopoly; analysis of the role of labor and unions; public goods; externalities and the public sector; and discussion of the problems of foreign aid, poverty, pollution, and tax reform. It explores international economics, trade and lending, tariffs, quotas and free trade, international adjustments, and balance of payment problems. Course materials include a video.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Discuss current topics in microeconomics.
    • Identify key terms and concepts in economics.
    • Illustrate key concepts and economic theories.
    • Apply the supply and demand principles to real-world situations.
    • Evaluate current economic conditions to predict future outcomes.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    BA 202 - Introduction to Macroeconomics


    Gives an understanding of how the United States allocates resources and produces, distributes, and consumes its goods and services. The student learns to analyze current economic events. Topics include the national income accounts, aggregate supply and demand, aggregate income, employment, inflation, determinants of consumption and investments, the role of money and the federal reserve, and monetary and fiscal policies. Course materials include a video.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Examine current topics in Macroeconomics.
    • Compare key terms and concepts in economics.
    • Demonstrate key concepts and economic theories.
    • Apply key concepts and principles to real world situations. 


    Credits: 3

  •  

    CO 111 - The Effective Communicator


    This course is designed for the learner who is both practical and forward-looking. We will focus on the real situations in which business communication takes place, with attention to observation, analysis, and the “how-to” of effective workplace communication. We will also discuss a variety of strategies for enhancing one’s immediate effectiveness, with an eye on how the development of communication skills forms an integral part of building one’s career.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EH 106 or equivalent is required. EH 107 or equivalent is recommended.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of the course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Apply to your business activities a clear and practical understanding of effective ways to communicate.
    • Learn and use the tools of business writing for immediate results and for career enhancement.
    • Develop and practice the skills of meeting management and business presentations.
    • Create and maintain a strategic approach to managing one’s own workplace-communication activities.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    ED 222 - Fundamentals of Training


    Presents the models of learning, theory, strategies, techniques, and research that help construct the field of Training and Development. It is intended to help the learner discover his/her own definition of “training” and fosters, through application of experience and knowledge, the development of a training program applicable to a specific type of adult learner and setting. The course covers such things as developing a training style, the application of training tools, and addressing and assessing competencies, as well as development and evaluation of programs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EH 106 or equivalent is required. EH 107 or equivalent is recommended.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Define and describe active training as a profession through readings, discussions, assessments, activities, and reflection, and how it is valuable to both organizations and employees.
    •  Compare and contrast adult learning theories as they relate to active training through research and discussion.
    • Assess and evaluate training needs of an organization and/or participant, through needs assessment techniques and training evaluations.
    • Develop and design training objectives and instructional activities as they relate to lesson and course outcomes and goals that are learner centered.
    • Examine learning strategies such as, opening exercises and brain-friendly presentations, and apply them to a training activity with use of technology.
    • Apply the skills, knowledge, and tools you have learned in the course to a case study in training, through reflection, analysis, synthesis and application.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    ED 301 - Educational Psychology


    Educational Psychology is the academic discipline that examines learning, development, self-regulation, and motivation. Educators use their knowledge of learners and learning as they teach in classrooms or provide other child-focused services. Throughout the course, we will examine principles of learning theory in educational settings, the nature of teaching, and consider what is involved in being an effective educator. With the focus on applying the principles of educational psychology and research on learning, the goal will be for the teaching and nonteaching student taking this course to recognize, plan, and present effective instruction. This will be accomplished by using a variety of approaches: discussions, classroom and personal examples, case studies, and reflection.  

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon successful completion of this course, you should be able to illustrate, in writing, an understanding and application of content as it applies to the following:

    • provide each student a comprehensive background in the field of Educational Psychology;
    • cover topics that engage you in cognitive, linguistic, personal, social, self-regulation, and moral development;
    • expose you to effective teaching practices, case studies, ways of making learners active thinkers, and the role learner’s play in the classroom environment;
    • present you with diverse ways of increasing learner motivation and managing the learning environment;
    • assist you in developing skills that are applicable in one’s daily work and a variety of educational settings as you plan for and instruct students, manage classrooms, and collaborate in professional learning environments; and
    • prompt you to research critical issues related to education (i.e. teacher accountability, proficiency based learning, common core standards, assessment, IDEA) and reflect on their importance in relation to your role in working with children.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    ED 308 - Adult Learning


    This course will help you look at adult learning in a very comprehensive way, spotlighting the context in which it takes place, who the participants are, what they learn and why, the nature of the learning process itself, new approaches to adult learning, the development of theory in adult learning, and other issues relevant to understanding adult learning.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Formulate a profile of today’s adult learner.
    • Differentiate between adult learning and childhood learning.
    • Evaluate the implications of teaching style and learning preferences on adult learning.
    • Assess newer approaches to adult learning.
    • Discriminate between the main theories and educational philosophical viewpoints of adult learning.
    • Examine the main assumptions about development throughout adulthood.
    • Analyze the meaning of lifelong learning and its implications for adult learners.
    • Synthesize your learning from this course with your own adult experiences and contribute to others’ learning experiences.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    ED 322 - Advanced Training Perspectives


    Offers the student deeper exposure to training methods, assessment of needs, planning strategies, instructional design, technology, and evaluation techniques. Students will develop the ability to manage, coordinate, and design training activities in organizational settings. Students gain a more in-depth understanding of the role of the trainer in the 21st century and working with a multigenerational workforce. The course focuses on the ATD competency standards for training professionals, where students will also be introduced to change management, positive psychology, and coaching methods.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 222.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Express the challenges, opportunities, and contemporary issues surrounding the profession of training in the 21st century through inquiry, research, and reflection.
    • Design advanced training activities, assessments, and presentations by using gap analysis, technology, and alternative instructional design methods.
    • Create an active training program by applying ATD competencies to activities, assessments, presentations, instructional style, and the training environment.
    • Evaluate and analyze instructional design, presentation methods, and training program outcomes through data collection, data interpretation, and communication.
    • Examine the diversity of a multigenerational workforce by comparing and contrasting the similarities and variances among different generations in a contemporary workforce.
    • Facilitate change and motivation by demonstrating leadership through positive psychology coaching techniques to foster performance improvement.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    ED 401 - Measurements and Evaluation


    The course is designed to develop student understanding of measurement and evaluation culminating to a final project where application of the new knowledge will result in critically evaluating a personally or professionally relevant assessment tool. Within each unit, students will be expected to read assigned chapters and complete activities that will support their work on the final project. Participation in the discussion board will require learners to apply concepts to their experiences and share their opinions. Through readings and constructed written responses, students will reflect on the historical perspectives in educational testing, acquire knowledge in understanding the purposes of various test types, and determine whether a test is a valid and reliable instrument. Students will also participate in hands-on activities that focus on test construction and fundamental descriptive statistics. The final unit will include necessary research on a self-selected assessment tool with the resulting outcome being a review and appraisal of that tool.   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PY 101; EH 106 or equivalent is required; EH 107 or equivalent is recommended.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe the impacts early theorists had on the history of assessment development.
    • Explain the major categories of tests through recognizing their practical uses.
    • Apply descriptive statistics for analyzing, interpreting, and reporting assessment data.
    • Define the different types of reliability and validity, and describe how they are used to evaluate aspects of a test or testing procedure.
    • Analyze moral and ethical issues in testing as it applies to test takers and professional settings.
    • Demonstrate an understanding for the purposes of applying tests in a specific professional setting (i.e., education, health care, business, etc.).
    • Reflect on and discuss experiences with personal and professional uses of measurement and evaluation to demonstrate meaningful application of the course content.
    • Apply cumulative knowledge gained throughout the course to critically evaluate an assessment tool.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    EH 100 - Fundamentals of Writing


    This beginning writing course is designed to provide students with introductory skills in writing. It will offer students opportunities to improve grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure, as well as provide them with the practice of basic writing. Focus will be on paragraph writing, organization, and attention to the writer’s audience. This course should prepare learners for higher level writing courses.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

    ·      Demonstrate an awareness of the writer’s audience.

    ·      Express coherent, focused, and organized ideas in written sentences and paragraphs, and essay form.

    ·      Demonstrate the ability to use appropriate grammar, punctuation, spelling, and sentence structure in written form.

    ·      Identify parts of speech and their relationship with writing.

    Credits: 3 credits


  •  

    EH 100 - Fundamentals of Writing (Four Credits)


    Part one of this course is a one-credit component designed to provide learners with an overview of the basics in English grammar, usage, and mechanics. The component should provide learners with a foundation to help them be more successful with related material in the rest of the Fundamentals of Writing course. Part two of the course is a three-credit beginning writing course designed to provide learners with introductory skills in writing. It will offer learners opportunities to improve grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure, as well as provide them with the practice of basic writing. Focus will be on paragraph writing, organization, and attention to the writer’s audience. This course should prepare learners for higher level writing courses.

     

     

    Assignment Overview
    This course has two parts, which includes a one-credit grammar component that students must successfully complete before moving on to the rest of the course. The one-credit grammar component is comprised of ten lessons, each of which contains a lesson plan, study notes, and a quiz. The three-credit component provides a foundation for basic writing and is comprised of 15 lessons and a final paper. 

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Recognize different parts of speech.
    • Distinguish between independent and dependent clauses.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of how grammar affects word choice by choosing the correct form of a word or phrase depending on its meaning within the sentence.
    • Identify sentences that use correct grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and sentence structure.
    • Demonstrate an awareness of the writer’s audience.
    • Express coherent, focused, and organized ideas in written sentences and paragraphs, and essay form.  
    • Demonstrate the ability to use appropriate grammar, punctuation, spelling, and sentence structure in written form.
    • Identify parts of speech and their relationship with writing.


    Credits: Four

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    EH 102 - Introduction to Literature


    An introductory survey course designed to deepen understanding and appreciation of the forms of literature, especially fiction, poetry, and drama. The course will examine genres selected from a range of historical periods.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 4 Units
    • Interactivity: None
    • Final Assessment: Final Paper


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Discuss the unique characteristics of fiction, poetry, and drama.
    • Describe the tools writers use to engage audiences.
    • Evaluate the impact of style on a literary work. 

     

    Credits: 3


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    EH 106 - English Composition I


    EH 106 is the first of two sequential composition courses required for all students who have not completed an equivalent college-level course. Students are introduced to effective writing strategies and compose a variety of compositions for different audiences and purposes. The course also provides a review of basic grammar, punctuation, and mechanics, and the application of those concepts to written communication.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NOTE: EH 106 will not satisfy Humanities requirements.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:
     

    • Review the principles of basic grammar, usage, and mechanics.
    • Apply these principles of basic grammar, usage, and mechanics as a basis for effective written communication.
    • Compose short essays for varying audiences and purposes written in clear, focused, well-organized, grammatically correct, and mechanically sound prose.
    • Apply APA formatting and documentation standards to compositions.


    Credits: 3

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    EH 107 - English Composition II


    EH 107 is the second of two sequential composition courses required for all students who have earned a C or above in EH 106 or its equivalent. The course is intended to expand and refine the student’s writing skills by focusing on the importance of the writing process itself, the relationship of reading to writing, and the fundamental skills required to communicate meaning to an audience through clear, credible, concise, and correct prose. Additionally, students will learn strategies and techniques for writing argument and using evidence to support one’s claims.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EH 106 or its equivalent. EH 107 will not satisfy Humanities requirements.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 6 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessement: None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Utilize the writing process to compose essays for different audiences and purposes.
    • Recognize that effective writing is clear, complete, concise, and correct.
    • Conduct library research, evaluate sources, integrate appropriate material into a composition, and document outside content appropriately.
    • Demonstrate the ability to comprehend, summarize, synthesize, analyze, and evaluate information.

     

    Credits: 3


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    EH 203 - American Literature I


    While EH 203,  American Literature I, is a literature survey course, it is also an interdisciplinary course as students will read works of literature and examine these in light of their historical contexts. The course begins in the Colonial Period with William Bradford and ends in the nineteenth century with Charlotte Perkins Gilman.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Proctored Exam

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Examine the connection between history and literature.

    • Evaluate the impact of community on the writings of the early Colonial Period.

    • Analyze the stylistic approaches individual authors use in their writing.


    Credits: 3

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    EH 204 - American Literature II


    This course is an introductory survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present. The readings are designed to introduce you to a variety of writers and to help you develop a sense of the major literary movements and themes in American literature. To this end, we will consider a broad scope of issues related to the literature, and you will be encouraged to contemplate, question, argue, and connect the readings and discussions to your own lives, observations, and experiences. In addition, this course will help you develop effective reading, writing, and analytical skills.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Boards

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Understand literature as an expression of human values within a historical and social context. 
    • Recognize important American writers and characteristics of their work.
    • Plan, write, and revise short critical responses about literature with good insights and suitable argument, organization, evidence, and analysis. 


    Credits: 3

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    EH 205 - Early British Writers


    This survey course examines the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf and other major writing from the Medieval Period such as Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, as well as representative writing from the Renaissance and Restoration, including works by Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, and Swift.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: None

    Final Assessment: Proctored Final Exam

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Describe the connections between history and literature;
    • Explain what is unique about early British literature;
    • Distinguish the styles of selected writers and the content of their works; and
    • Evaluate the diversity of values guiding writers and their works.


    Credits: 3

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    ES 101 - Introduction to Environmental Science


    Introduction to Environmental Science is designed to prepare you to understand and to find solutions to environmental problems. The readings in the required text present a broad overview of the current major environmental issues facing society. The text, the instructor notes, and the activities are geared toward raising awareness of these issues, emphasizing the interrelation between the environment and public health, and conveying an awareness of how current environmental issues directly affect our own lives. The course stresses that humans are an integral part of natural ecosystems and, as such, human health and well-being is both connected with, and dependent upon, the health and stability of the environment. ES 101 offers a good introduction to the principles that help people to understand their environment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EH 106 or equivalent is required; EH 107 or equivalent is recommended.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of ecological principles and population dynamics, their impact on the environment, and their effect of environmental degradation on public health. 
    • Research an environmental issue that is of personal interest and become proficient in writing a research paper in scientific format. 
    • Examine personal beliefs regarding the environment and understand how individual and collective behavior affects environmental and human health. 
    • Improve understanding of the variety of ways that organisms interact with both the physical and the biological environment, and how different processes affect organisms, populations, communities, and ecosystems. 
    • Express personal thoughts, understandings, and conclusions that pertain to current environmental and public health-related problems. 
    • Enhance intellectual curiosity and critical-thinking skills by gathering and evaluating knowledge beyond the course material.

     

    Credits: 3


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    FY 100 - The Art of Student Success


    Through research designed to promote introspection and self-evaluation, students will create a strategy for success in an online college environment.  Through guided self-reflection students will evaluate their English, math, and research skills and then identify resources that will help them improve upon these skills. Students will create a complete financial assessment of the cost of obtaining a degree and explore the regulations and responsibilities associated with financial aid. A guided, self-reflective approach to creating a strategy for degree completion will be the final assignment in the class.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    ·      Demonstrate familiarity with college policies and resources.

    ·      Self-evaluate English, math, academic writing, and research skills, and determine how these skills correspond to academic success.

    ·      Identify relevant resources that will address priority skill areas.

    ·      Recognize the full cost of a college degree, and understand the responsibility involved in any corresponding student loan debt.

    ·      Develop a plan for success, through introspection and self-evaluation, to achieve academic goals.

    Credits: 3 credits


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    HU 100 - Introduction to Human Services


    This course provides an overview of the field of Human Services. Students will learn about both historical changes and the existing structure of Human service delivery models, as well as become familiar with values and principles currently embraced in the field. The course will cover the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to work as a culturally competent professional in diverse human service settings. There will be an emphasis on the wide-ranging needs of various populations receiving services, and special attention will be paid to the role of the human service professional and critical elements of the supporting relationship.

     

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Community Project

    Course Learning Objectives

    • Describe the roles and responsibilities of the Human Services Professional.
    • Articulate the changes in the field of Human Services and identify key aspects of the current service delivery model.
    • Demonstrate an awareness of some of the multifaceted needs of diverse populations who are commonly served by Human Service Professionals.
    • Analyze strengths-based and recovery-oriented approaches to serving people in the Human Services field.
    • Examine the importance of understanding various values and beliefs held by populations served in the Human Services field and explore approaches to gaining greater sensitivity toward them.
    • Assess the professional values and standards embraced in the field, and explain how they can be applied to day-to-day practice and ethical dilemmas. 


    Credits: 3 credits

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    HU 300 - Case Management


    This online course incorporates the Ethical Standards for Human Service Professionals set forth by the National Organization for Human Services, particularly from a case management perspective. It includes a strong focus on effective approaches to screening, intake, assessment, treatment planning, advocacy, community referrals, and evaluation of personal practice. Students will have opportunities to increase self-awareness, gain a greater understanding of the needs of underrepresented individuals and groups, and learn about ethical issues case managers face while serving vulnerable populations. The course will place a strong emphasis on the case manager’s role on the interdisciplinary team and treatment approaches that promote autonomy, dignity, community inclusion, and wellbeing of populations served in the Human Services field.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note:    This course is not yet available but will be a future offering.

    Course Learning Objectives
    • Recognize the Ethical Standards for Human Service Professionals, and what it means to be a competent case manager in the field of Human Services.
    • Reflect on all aspects of assessment, treatment planning and implementation, as well as effective case management approaches that promote community inclusion and holistic wellbeing for vulnerable populations. 
    • Examine the role of the case manager on the interdisciplinary team, and the complex needs of underrepresented populations receiving services in the field.
    • Assess ethical issues that affect both case managers and the lives of people-served in Human Services, and identify strategies for professionalism in case management.
    • Articulate philosophical approaches to case management and examine strategies to engage in evaluation of personal practices.


    Credits: 3 credits
  •  

    HY 104 - Modern Global History


    Modern Global History studies the development of world systems, civilizations and cultures from the Age of Exploration, c. 1500 CE, to the present, with the aim of understanding both unique and inter-related historical developments, threats, and opportunities as these relate to an increasingly inter-connected world and its people.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units/12 Lessons
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Paper


    Course Learning Objectives
    Students will:

    • Analyze experiences and situations outside their current and local frame of reference.
    • Understand an increasingly competitive professional job market, both domestic and international, by studying its historical development.
    • Correlate major historical themes with their own particular existence and lifestyles.
    • Understand the antecedent historical environment which has conditioned the present global situation.
    • Assess the impact of historical events on aspects of human status.
    • Demonstrate how socially constructed notions influence historical events.


    Credits: 3 credits
  •  

    HY 201 - History of the United States I


    This course examines how race, gender, and class shaped the experience of Americans in their social, political, and professional roles. The exploration includes the impact of class, religion, race, ethnicity, gender roles, and expectations for all Americans from colonial times through the Reconstruction. Additionally, students will explore the cultural influence of various races, classes, and genders throughout American history including contributions to the disciplines of archeology, primary documents, literature, and art.  Throughout the course, students will investigate themes of continuity and change in the lives of Americans from pre-contact to the U.S. Civil War.

    Students have the option of choosing a Community-Based Learning section of this course.

    Community Based Learning:

    Community-based learning (CBL) is an experiential instructional strategy that engages students in solving problems within their schools and communities as part of their academic studies, transforming them from passive recipients to active participants in their education and community while providing a deeper understanding of theories and course content.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EH 106 or equivalent is required; EH 107 or equivalent is recommended.

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 6 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Demonstrate how socially constructed notions of gender, race, ethnicity, and class have shaped the reality of American lives. 
    • Assess the impact of historical events on the social, political, and economic status of diverse groups of Americans. 
    • Analyze artifacts, artworks, primary-written documents, and literary contributions of Americans and how they contributed to the American cultural fabric.

     

    Credits: 3


  •  

    HY 202 - History of the United States II


    This course is an introductory survey of American history from the end of Reconstruction to the present. The first is simple chronology: You need a basic grounding in “what happened when,” in order to address the even more interesting question of “why.” Second, you will learn to think historically: to analyze past events, to place them in a larger context of historical change, to criticize your own assumptions, and look at the past from different perspectives, you’ll accomplish this goal by examining and analyzing primary documents. The third goal is to help you learn to communicate your ideas, through writing and discussion.

    Students have the option of choosing a Community-Based Learning section of this course.

    Community Based Learning:

    Community-based learning (CBL) is an experiential instructional strategy that engages students in solving problems within their schools and communities as part of their academic studies, transforming them from passive recipients to active participants in their education and community while providing a deeper understanding of theories and course content.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EH 106 or equivalent is required; EH 107 or equivalent is recommended.

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 6 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Project


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Demonstrate how socially constructed notions of gender, race, ethnicity, and class have shaped the reality of American lives. 
    • Assess the impact of historical events on the social, political, and economic status of diverse groups of Americans. 
    • Analyze artifacts, artworks, primary-written documents, and literary contributions of Americans and how they contributed to the American cultural fabric. 
    • Write an historical essay with proper APA citation.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    HY 421 - Special Topics: ‘We Can Do It!’ A History of American Women in the Workforce, 1920-Present


    This course will examine women as active participants in the workforce from the roaring 20s to the modern era. It  will consider how diverse groups of women understood their work experiences and balanced the competing responsibilities of household, family, and work. Additionally, this course will explore the historical trends of how women overcame challenges as they entered the workforce. Topics will include: pay inequalities, segregation of work, glass ceilings, leadership roles, wage work, and gender specific roles and responsibilities in the workplace.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Software required: Microsoft Word and PowerPoint.

    This is a 6 week online only course being offered summer 2017.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Demonstrate how socially constructed notions of gender, race ethnicity and class have shaped the reality of American women’s lives in the workforce.
    • Assess the impact of historical events on the social, political and economic status of diverse groups of American women and how these events affected their roles as workers.
    • Analyze artifacts, artworks, primary written documents and literary contributions of American women and how they contributed to the American women’s contributions to labor in the workforce.


    Credits: 3 Offered: Online; Summer 2017-Accelerated Online course

  •  

    ID 100 - Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies


    This course is designed to introduce you to interdisciplinary thinking, writing, and research. Being interdisciplinary is increasingly significant because professional success is often measured by the ability to solve ever-changing and complex problems. By learning how to make connections and integrate information from multiple sources (the interdisciplinary perspective), you will be better able to approach these problems with confidence and knowledge.

    Beginning with the history of interdisciplinary studies (IDS), each consecutive lesson helps you foster interdisciplinary traits and approach problems, questions, or needs by connecting multiple perspectives and applying them to your thinking, writing, and research. You will learn to articulate the nature and value of interdisciplinary thinking as you move toward your final paper, the literature review. Upon successful completion of the course, you will be prepared for advanced interdisciplinary study.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you will be able to do the following:

    ·      Identify the traits and skills characteristic of interdisciplinary thinking.

    ·      Explain the difference between disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to learning and constructing knowledge.

    ·      Recognize the value of the interdisciplinary approach in personal and career development.

    ·      Reflect upon the “Toolkit” that interdisciplinary studies fosters.

    ·      Critically analyze disciplinary literature for interdisciplinary purposes.

    ·      Apply the Broad Model Rubric to research and writing processes.

    Credits: 3 credits


  •  

    ID 220 - IDS Capstone - Associate of Science


    This course is designed to deepen students’ understanding of interdisciplinary thinking, writing, and research, providing learners with opportunities to recognize, appreciate, and critique multiple perspectives within and across disciplines. The course also provides students with opportunities to evaluate and synthesize knowledge across multiple areas of study, as well as offer foundational opportunities to apply learning experiences to real world issues.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you will be able to do the following:

    ·      Recognize the value of diverse perspectives within and across disciplines.

    ·      Reflect on learning experiences within and across fields of study.

    ·      Demonstrate a foundational understanding of approaches to critique and integrate varying worldviews.

    ·      Articulate approaches to synthesizing multiple perspectives and knowledge across disciplines to real world issues.

    ·      Understand the ethical responsibilities of conducting research.

    Credits: 3 credits


  •  

    ID 420 - IDS Capstone - Bachelor of Science


    This course is designed to deepen students’ understanding of interdisciplinary thinking, writing, and research, providing learners with opportunities to recognize, appreciate, and critique multiple perspectives within and across disciplines. The course also provides students with opportunities to evaluate and synthesize knowledge across multiple areas of study, as well as offer foundational opportunities to apply learning experiences to real world issues.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you will be able to do the following:

    ·      Explain the concept of disciplinary perspective.

    ·      Apply the traits and skills characteristic of interdisciplinary thinking.

    ·      Apply the integrated model of the interdisciplinary research process.

    ·      Understand the ethical responsibilities of conducting research.

    ·      Communicate your research to appropriate audiences.

    Credits: 3 credits


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    MA 105 - College Algebra


    This course is designed to give you a solid foundation in algebra, preparing you for more advanced courses such as statistics, finite mathematics, and computer science. The focus of the course will be to show how algebra can model and solve authentic real-world problems. Topics will include functions, linear equations and inequalities, systems of linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, rational expressions and equations, radicals, quadratic equations, and exponential and logarithmic equations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Working knowledge of beginning algebra.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: None

    Final Assessment: Proctored Final Exam

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Apply your knowledge of algebra to solve linear equations and inequalities.
    • Use your problem-solving skills to create mathematical models.
    • Perform operations of real numbers, polynomials, and radicals.
    • Apply your knowledge of algebra to solve quadratic equations.
    • Solve exponential equations.
    • Solve logarithmic equations.


    Credits: 3

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    MA 107 - Contemporary Mathematics


    This course is intended to investigate current real-world problems using topics that are not covered in a typical algebra course. Mathematical models based on maps, data, voting, and finance will be introduced and applied. Students will use these mathematical models to solve problems in management science, business, biology, social sciences, and more. Students will discuss problems from these fields, investigate them through project-based learning, and demonstrate mastery through assessments.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: None

    Final Assessment: Open-Book Final Exam

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Identify situations in life that can be modeled by mathematics.
    • Apply mathematical algorithms and processes to solve real-world problems.
    • Identify how everyday path problems can be estimated through heuristics.
    • Estimate minimum cost solutions to mapping/bin packing/order requirement problems.
    • Create and interpret basic statistical output to help describe a data problem or solution.
    • Present alternative voting systems based on their individual strengths and weaknesses.
    • Choose and calculate financial investments/loans based on compound interest.


    Credits: 3

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    MA 205 - Elementary Statistics


    The main goal of this course is to teach students the fundamental procedures behind basic statistic practice, as well as to introduce students to how real-world data can be investigated through these procedures.  To achieve these goals, students will complete weekly problem sets, written assignments investigating the lesson’s content, projects based on real-world data, and on-line quizzes to assess knowledge.  A final exam will assess all covered content.  Topics covered are basic statistical vocabulary, graphical presentations of data, basic numerical descriptive measures, basic probability, discrete and continuous distributions of data, confidence intervals, formal hypothesis testing, comparison of two variables, analysis of variance, chi-square hypothesis testing, and simple linear regression.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is offered online as part of the General Studies curriculum with monthly start dates.

    It will also be offered during the 2017 summer session with an on campus component.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: None

    Final Assessment: Proctored Final Exam

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Apply your working knowledge of the basic concepts used in statistics;
    • Interpret statistics used in a variety of research settings;
    • Demonstrate your familiarity with statistical software through the use and application of SPSS; and
    • Use fundamental statistical knowledge to interpret more advanced statistical procedures.


    Credits: 3 Offered: Online: Summer 2017, Week 2

  •  

    MG 101 - Introduction to Management


    An examination of the decision-making process as it affects individuals and groups. It discusses principles and techniques of business as they relate to the planning, organization, coordination, leadership, direction, and controlling of the business enterprise. Reviews the day-to-day problems faced by managers, focusing on how to solve them.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

     Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe what management is and how it affects the successful operation of an organization.
    • Explain the challenges involved in effective decision making and the role leadership plays in the successful deployment of the decision.
    • Identify organizational structures and how they reinforce the strategic intent of the organization.
    • Discuss how effective human resources practices support the success of the organization.
    • Describe a strategic planning process and identify the manager’s role in this process.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    MK 201 - Introduction to Marketing


    Emphasizes basic decision-making tools and analytic processes by the marketing manager including: product policy and new product development, distribution and channel systems, personal selling and mass selling techniques, pricing, promotion, and marketing program implementation.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: None

    Final Assessment: Final Project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Provide an introduction and exposure to, and an understanding of, the marketing concept.
    • Develop an ability to analyze and assess an organization and its products and services.
    • Develop awareness and a practical knowledge of the marketing mix, especially as evidenced within your own company or organization, and as utilized by your company’s/organization’s senior management.
    • Gain a working familiarity with the terminology, objectives, and issues that concern and impact marketing in the twenty-first century.
    • Demonstrate decision-making abilities as you bring a product and/or service to market via a marketing plan.
    • Demonstrate strategic thinking relative to marketing decisions.
    • Describe essential principles of consumer behavior in relation to marketing.
    • Perform a competitive analysis.
    • Assess your own company’s ability to effectively market itself.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    NN 101 - Introduction to Nutrition


    Introduces the student to basic scientific principles and human physiology through exploration of the field of nutrition science. This course also presents the problems of world hunger and studies the impact that modern civilization has on agriculture and food supply. (NN 101 is not intended for students who require a nutrition course in the pursuit of a degree in Nursing or who require a nutrition course taught at the clinical level. The more appropriate course then would be NN 202.)

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Online Final Exam

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Discuss the factors that influence food choices.
    • Discuss the research process and explain why scientific research is the source of valid nutrition information.
    • List the energy-producing nutrients and describe the functions of each in the body.
    • Describe the roles of vitamins, minerals, and water in the body, and list significant food sources of each.
    • Describe the influence of diet and exercise on body composition, obesity, and degenerative disease.
    • Discuss the importance of optimum nutrition for wellness at different stages of the life cycle.
    • List hazards to a safe food supply, and discuss methods to prevent food-borne illnesses.
    • Describe how poverty, overpopulation, and environmental degradation contribute to world hunger and the diminution of an adequate and safe worldwide food supply.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    NN 202 - Nutrition for Health Care Professionals


    This course introduces the student to the principles of normal nutrition. Assessment of nutritional status and normal nutrient requirements of different age levels and life stages are explored. Nutritional care as part of professional nursing practice is emphasized. This course is designed for students enrolled in programs that require a nutrition course and others who have an interest in how nutrition relates to health.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe the multiple factors that influence nutritional intake and identify the essential nutrients required for optimal health.
    • Describe the energy-producing nutrients and include the key roles of each in the body.
    • Describe the functions of essential vitamins, minerals, and water, and identify significant dietary sources of these nutrients.
    • Identify the parameters of nutritional assessment used for healthy individuals and include those parameters used for individuals stressed by illness.
    • Describe the basic processes involved in the digestion, absorption, and metabolism of food.
    • Apply the special nutrient requirements of individuals at various stages in the life cycle to case study scenarios.
    • Demonstrate the ability to apply appropriate nutritional interventions to various diseases or conditions within case studies.
    • Demonstrate the ability to modify diets to match essential nutrient requirements during different stages of the life cycle.
    • Recognize the significance of nutrition as it impacts health and health care delivery.

     

    Credits: 3


  •  

    PH 200 - Human Nature and Ethics


    A study of seminal philosophical questions and their relevance to what it means to be a human being. Topics include key theories of reality and knowledge and a substantial focus on ethics, including ethical theory and applied ethical issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course has no prerequisites.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments:  5 Units/10 Lessons

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to

    • Identify key concepts and terms in philosophy;
    • Explain basic philosophical theories and their significance;
    • Demonstrate critical thinking and reading skills;
    • Apply ethical theories to particular moral issues;
    • Demonstrate writing proficiency appropriate for a mid-level undergraduate class.


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    PH 201 - Introduction to Greek Philosophy


    An overview of the thought and writings of some of the earliest Greek philosophers, particularly Plato and Aristotle. The course guides students through an exploration of some of the world’s “big questions” such as “What is humanity’s place in the universe?” and “What do we have to guide us to learn to live together in the world?”

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EH 106 or equivalent is required; EH 107 or equivalent is recommended.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the thought of various Greek philosophers from Thales to Aristotle and be able to distinguish where they differed from one another.
    • Demonstrate the ability to articulate your own personal philosophy guided by the writings of the various Greek philosophers.
    • Compare and contrast the ethical and political theories of Plato and Aristotle with each other as well as with current ethical dilemmas and political situations.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    PH 204 - Philosophy of Gender


    A theoretical study that explores what, if any, differences there are between men and women. The course will examine how parenting, education, and the media influence gender beliefs and the role of gender in various social structures such as the family, politics, and religion.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe and give examples of how philosophy underlies the way people have attached meaning to life and ordered their behavior and beliefs accordingly throughout history and across cultures. 
    • Identify contemporary issues that pertain to gender, and analyze them to explore how an understanding of gender also influences many social and political issues. 
    • Compare and contrast some of the complex and diverse gender experiences that occur across cultures, age differences, and sexual orientations. 
    • Cite examples from your personal, family, workplace, or social relationships that reflect an understanding that a philosophy of gender impacts your daily life. 
    • Synthesize course materials to articulate how this course has influenced your own philosophy of gender. 
    • Identify situations where a clearer and renewed understanding of gender issues might reshape our individual, social, or political lives.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    PY 101 - Introduction to Psychology I


    This course provides a general introduction to the science of human behavior. Topics include the history and scope of psychology, nature/nurture and behavioral adaptation (genetics, evolution, learning), physiological mechanisms of behavior (the nervous system, motivation, sleep, emotion), cognitive mechanisms of behavior (perception, memory), the growth of the mind and person (cognitive development, social development, social cognition, social influences on behavior), personality and disorders (theories of personality, mental disorders and their treatment).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Required for all other courses in psychology. 

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units/10 Lessons

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Assignment

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Define psychology as a science.
    • Describe the historical roots and influential factors of the study of human behavior.
    • Identify and apply various methods used to research areas of psychology.
    • Explain the impact of heredity and environment on behavior.
    • Discuss the physical, emotional, social and cognitive factors that influence normal/abnormal behavior.
    • Apply basic psychological principles and processes to their private and professional lives.
    • Demonstrate competency in information literacy by assessing and applying appropriate scholarly and non-scholarly information from various sources.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    PY 207 - Psychopathology


    This course provides an overview of psychopathology, the study of abnormal behavior. It consists of a broad survey of mental disorders as defined in the DSM-V and considers the biological, social, and cultural factors that influence the onset, symptoms, and treatment of mental disorders. It reviews current treatment options and explores critical issues involved in the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders. This course does not provide one with the knowledge or skills to diagnose and formally treat individuals who are experiencing psychiatric symptoms. However, this course will provide the student with a foundational understanding of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, treatment modalities, and the recovery process.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 6 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Identify the signs and symptoms of the mental disorders classified in the DSM-5.
    • Recognize and critically discuss the biological, social and cultural contexts of abnormal behavior.
    • Analyze the process of assessment and diagnosis of mental illnesses.
    • Examine treatment interventions and the role of recovery in the lives of people with mental illness.
    • Utilize critical thinking skills to analyze, assess, synthesize, and apply your understanding of mental disorders.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    PY 211 - Lifespan Development


    This course utilizes a lifespan approach to human development.  It focuses on factors associated with physical, cognitive, social, and personality development from birth through adulthood.  Using major developmental theories as a framework, biological, psychological, and environmental factors and their interplay will be discussed.  Topics will also include philosophical and historical bases of theories as well as the cultural factors that influence development.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PY 101.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Explain at least four major theories of human development.
    • Describe the methods used to study human development and be able to critically evaluate research findings and conclusions.
    • Explain several ways in which sociocultural influences affect human development.
    • Apply the concepts of developmental psychology to relevant practical issues that may arise in your day-to-day personal and professional life.
    • Reflect on an important developmental experience in order to gain new insights into your own growth and development.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    PY 301 - Personality Theory


    Critically examines the major theoretical approaches to understanding personality, including the works of Freud, Jung, Skinner, Maslow, and Rogers. Methods of assessment such as self-report and projective testing are discussed. The theories, methodology, and research results pertinent to a number of topics in the psychology of personality are addressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PY 101

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: None

    Final Assessment: None

    Course Learning Objectives

    • Translate practical knowledge related to developmental theories and research of educational psychology into practice;
    • Describe how diverse developmental, cognitive, and behavioral theories can be applied within the classroom;
    • Integrate the principles of educational psychology by recognizing diverse learning styles and planning instructional approaches for effective learning environments;
    • Explain how learner motivation and self-regulation can be increased and the impact of that in the classroom;
    • Assess the advantages and disadvantages of educational measurement and evaluation in relation to teaching and learning; and
    • Synthesize educational theory and current research in the field in order to support educational perspectives and instructional practices.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    PY 304 - Learning Theories


    This course examines major theories of learning relevant to understanding how learning results in memory. Classical and operant conditioning are compared and contrasted, with special emphasis placed on understanding positive and negative reinforcement and punishment schedules. Cognitive learning, observational learning, learning style preferences and techniques, as well as motivation, stages of memory, and learning across the lifespan are also explored.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PY 101.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 6 Units

     Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Compare and contrast early and contemporary theories of learning.
    • Distinguish between classical and operant conditioning.
    • Critique features of memory and information processing.
    • Apply your understanding of adult learning theories, including Behaviorist, Constructivist, Cognitive, and Motivational Theories, through projects, reflections, and illustrations.
    • Synthesize and integrate the theories discussed in the course.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    PY 305 - Social Psychology


    Examines the way individuals are affected by and interact in social situations. Topics include attitude formation and change, the attribution process, inter-group conflict and conflict resolution, leadership, the social psychology of health and aging.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PY 101 or SO 201

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: None

    Final Assessment: Research Project and Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • List at least three major theorists/researchers in the social-psychology field. 
    • Define social psychology, conformity, prejudice, aggression, and persuasion. 
    • Explain four ways that mass media influence people’s choices. 
    • Name the components of Cognitive Dissonance Theory. 
    • Define self-justification and self-presentation. 
    • Discuss at least five important social problems and the significance of social psychology as related to these problems. 
    • List five reasons why research is conducted in social psychology. 
    • Explain three factors that contribute to our selection of an intimate partner. 
    • Define and differentiate between stereotype and prejudice. 
    • Discuss framing and its impact on our social cognition.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    PY 306 - Adolescent Psychology


    A theoretical and practical exploration of adolescent development in light of the physiological, cognitive, and social changes of this period. Readings and student assignments will serve to relate the research and theory presented in the readings with relevant and practical adolescent behavior.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PY 101

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units/12 Lessons

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Discuss the interaction of the biological, cognitive, and social transitions that affect an adolescent’s development.
    • Develop an understanding of the complex interaction between nature and nurture on the biopsychosocial development of the adolescent.
    • Distinguish between healthy and unhealthy family interactions and the influence of these effects on the psychological well-being of the adolescent.
    • Explain the interaction of the social and cultural effects on an adolescent’s identity and development through involvement with peer groups.
    • Apply your understanding of various school systems, media influences, and leisure activities that influence an adolescent’s level of achievement to a model of maximizing an adolescent’s development.
    • Discuss the interaction of the theories of identity and autonomy with cultural, ethnic, social, and psychological influences.
    • Develop a working model of the most effective means to influence healthy autonomy and identity formation in adolescents.
    • Identify the unique cultural and social pressures that affect an adolescent’s sexual development.
    • Discuss the theoretical bases for the formation of intimate relationships in adolescents.
    • Describe the influence of externalizing or internalizing problems in stressful situations on the development of psychosocial problems in adolescents.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    PY 307 - Educational Psychology


    Educational Psychology is the academic discipline that examines learning, development, self-regulation, and motivation. Educators use their knowledge of learners and learning as they teach in classrooms or provide other child-focused services. Throughout the course, we will examine principles of learning theory in educational settings, the nature of teaching, and consider what is involved in being an effective educator. With the focus on applying the principles of educational psychology and research on learning, the goal will be for the teaching and non-teaching student taking this course to recognize, plan, and present effective instruction. This will be accomplished by using a variety of approaches: discussions, classroom and personal examples, case studies, and reflection.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PY 101

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon successful completion of this course, you should be able to illustrate, in writing, an understanding and application of content as it applies to the following:

    • provide each student a comprehensive background in the field of Educational Psychology;
    • cover topics that engage you in cognitive, linguistic, personal, social, self-regulation, and moral development;
    • expose you to effective teaching practices, case studies, ways of making learners active thinkers, and the role learner’s play in the classroom environment;
    • present you with diverse ways of increasing learner motivation and managing the learning environment;
    • assist you in developing skills that are applicable in one’s daily work and a variety of educational settings as you plan for and instruct students, manage classrooms, and collaborate in professional learning environments; and
    • prompt you to research critical issues related to education (i.e. teacher accountability, proficiency based learning, common core standards, assessment, IDEA) and reflect on their importance in relation to your role in working with children.

    .

    Credits: 3


  •  

    PY 401 - Measurements and Evaluation


    The course is designed to develop student understanding of measurement and evaluation culminating to a final project where application of the new knowledge will result in critically evaluating a personally or professionally relevant assessment tool. Within each unit, students will be expected to read assigned chapters and complete activities that will support their work on the final project. Participation in the discussion board will require learners to apply concepts to their experiences and share their opinions. Through readings and constructed written responses, students will reflect on the historical perspectives in educational testing, acquire knowledge in understanding the purposes of various test types, and determine whether a test is a valid and reliable instrument. Students will also participate in hands-on activities that focus on test construction and fundamental descriptive statistics. The final unit will include necessary research on a self-selected assessment tool with the resulting outcome being a review and appraisal of that tool.   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PY 101; EH 106 or equivalent is required; EH 107 or equivalent is recommended.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe the impacts early theorists had on the history of assessment development.
    • Explain the major categories of tests through recognizing their practical uses.
    • Apply descriptive statistics for analyzing, interpreting, and reporting assessment data.
    • Define the different types of reliability and validity, and describe how they are used to evaluate aspects of a test or testing procedure.
    • Analyze moral and ethical issues in testing as it applies to test takers and professional settings.
    • Demonstrate an understanding for the purposes of applying tests in a specific professional setting (i.e., education, health care, business, etc.).
    • Reflect on and discuss experiences with personal and professional uses of measurement and evaluation to demonstrate meaningful application of the course content.
    • Apply cumulative knowledge gained throughout the course to critically evaluate an assessment tool.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    PY 408 - Special Topics: Psychology of Cinema


    For many, film is a magnificent obsession. Films invite us into different lives and worlds and sometimes don’t let go. At least the good films do this: they stay will us for a while. They stick with you. You think about them after you leave the theater and want to talk about them with others. Over time thoughts and discussions recur and the film experience becomes a part of your very being. The mail goal of this course will be to explore different areas of psychology through film. We will also evaluate the accuracy of the ways in which psychology is depicted in the popular media by comparing it to actual psychological research. This course is designed 1) to help students gain a better understanding of the principles of psychology by surveying major concepts and theories in film and 2) to stimulate critical thinking through application of these theories to events in their own lives.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is being offered during the 2016 summer session with an on campus component.

    Credits: 3 Offered: Online: Summer 2016, Week 1: Semester 201703
  •  

    SC 200 - Physical Science


    This course will provide an overview of physical science involving the study of matter and its interactions with surroundings.  Content will be topical in nature and focused on dynamics, energy, electromagnetism, atomic, and nuclear theory, radiation, and chemistry applications. There is no lab required with this course.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units/14 Lessons

    Interactivity: Discussion Forum

    Final Assessment: Final Project

    Course Learning Objectives

    • Describe energy and energy transfer on a macroscopic level.
    • Explain principles of electricity and magnetism.
    • Explain light and the electromagnetic spectrum.
    • Describe the composition of matter on an atomic and subatomic level.  
    • Distinguish between different forms of radiation. 
    • Summarize practical applications of radiation technology.
    • Explain how physical principles lead to chemical principles.
    • Relate physical science principles to everyday life.


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SO 201 - Principles of Sociology


    This course provides an overview of the field of sociology, the study of human society.  The course will demonstrate the dynamic nature of social behavior and the interactions among individuals and groups within the framework of society. We will examine the sociological perspective and the building blocks of culture, socialization and interaction; group experiences and axes of inequality (social class, race and gender); social institutions including the family and education; and global issues such as population concerns and social change.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units/10 Lessons
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Paper


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Develop an understanding of the sociological perspective and sociological theories.
    • Examine and apply sociological concepts to ideas and topics related to our lives.
    • Understand how cultural and social forces shape society and examine how these forces shape our views of and experiences in our world.
    • Critically reflect upon the ways social inequality shapes the experiences of individuals and groups.
    • Examine and assess the role of social institutions and social change in society.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    SO 202 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    This course will focus on the various components of the American criminal justice system. It provides students with an in-depth look at the function of each component, the challenges facing the system, and the professionals who work in the system. Furthermore, the course seeks to provide students with a sociological, historical, political, and legal context in which to discuss the key issues facing the system in the 21st century and beyond. Also, students are provided with an in-depth look at the criminal justice profession along with a critical discussion on ethics in the field.  

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units
    Interactivity: Discussion Forum
    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe the functions of each component of the criminal justice system.
    • Discuss the key issues or challenges facing the criminal justice system in the 21st century.
    • Evaluate the various ethical challenges within the criminal justice system.
    • Identify and describe the various responsibilities of the various officials within the system.
    • Examine the public’s attitude towards the offender and the impact this has on the laws and policy within the system and legal practices.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    SO 204 - Methods of Social Research


    This course is designed to introduce the student to the logic and character of scientific and alternative means of social inquiry. It examines the function of observation, concept formation, proposition arrangement and testing of theory as components of the scientific process in sociology.

    Credits: 3 credits
  •  

    SO 210 - Quantitative Methods and Data Analysis in Social Science Research


    This course is designed to introduce and familiarize the student to the logic and character of scientific and alternative means of social inquiry.  It examines the function of observation, concept formation, proposition arrangement and testing of theory as components of the scientific process in the social sciences.  The course introduces students to a variety of statistical techniques that can be used in a number of research settings.  It provides a hands on approach in surveying various statistical and data analysis techniques using a number of computer based programs for data entry, data modification and interpretation. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SO201  or SW101  

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to do the following:

     

    1. Develop a core understanding of the logic (including validity and reliability) and applications of research in the fields of Criminal Justice, Political Science, Social Work and Sociology;
    2. Develop a critical mindset that allows students to understand what it means to both consume and produce research in the 21st century; 
    3. Develop a core understanding of the key ethical issues facing researchers in the fields of Criminal Justice, Political Science, Social Work and Sociology;
    4. Examine the various quantitative research techniques (including survey research, experimental design, evaluation research and secondary analysis) that are useful to the student’s particular field of study and further evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research methods.  The data analysis components is designed to have students develop a critical mindset when it comes to being both consumers and producers of data;
    5. Interpret raw data and secondary data sources; 
    6. Analyze data using a variety of computer based tools (numbers, Excel, SPSS, etc.), in doing so will develop an understanding of basic statistical techniques; 
    7. Develop the tools necessary to understand and critically evaluate and effectively apply a variety of descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. 


    Credits: 5 credits

  •  

    SO 211 - Qualitative Methods in Social Science Research


    This course introduces students to qualitative research from various social sciences by focusing on micro-level processes of peoples’ lives.  it examines concepts such as language, meanings, identities and discourse as they connect to larger structural and macro-level institutions.  Students study foundational concepts, research questions that guide qualitative research, ethical issues, and methodological challenges before exploring, practicing, analyzing and writing about methods of data collection such as in-depth interviewing, fieldwork/ethnography, focus groups and content analysis.  

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to do the following:

     

    1. Understand and analyze the qualitative approach to research question formation and data collection, and foundational concepts and theoretical frameworks of qualitative methods within larger societal structures;
    2. Identify and examine ethical and methodological challenges of researchers conducting qualitative research;
    3. Practice and apply qualitative skills of data collection of various qualitative methods;
    4. Analyze and present qualitative data in oral and written communication. 


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SO 301 - Social Problems


    This  course examines the major social problems and issues in a modern industrial and post-industrial society. It explores both sides of each issue and critically evaluates proposed solutions. Students develop skills in the analysis of social problems and in making informed judgments about their causes and solutions. Special emphasis is given to problems of current interest.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units/10 Lessons
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Paper


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Examine and apply sociological concepts and sociological theories to the study of social problems.
    • Analyze the ways social inequality shapes the social problems faced by groups within society.
    • Understand and examine a number of specific social problems within society.
    • Examine and assess the role of social problems facing various social institutions in society.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    SO 302 - Social Psychology


    Examines the way individuals are affected by and interact in social situations. Topics include attitude formation and change, the attribution process, inter-group conflict and conflict resolution, leadership, the social psychology of health, and aging.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SO 201; EH 106 or equivalent required; EH 107 or equivalent is recommended.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: None

    Final Assessment: Research Project and Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • List at least three major theorists/researchers in the social psychology field. 
    • Define social psychology, conformity, prejudice, aggression, and persuasion. 
    • Explain four ways that mass media influence people’s choices. 
    • Name the components of Cognitive Dissonance Theory. 
    • Define self-justification and self-presentation. 
    • Discuss at least five important social problems and the significance of social psychology as related to these problems. 
    • List five reasons why research is conducted in social psychology. 
    • Explain three factors that contribute to our selection of an intimate partner. 
    • Define and differentiate between stereotype and prejudice. 
    • Discuss framing and its impact on our social cognition.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    SO 309 - Human Behavior and Development


    The course focuses on the development of people in their environment and explores how individuals relate to memberships in families, groups, organizations and communities over their life span. The course also addresses how social, biological, and cultural systems affect human potential and development through examining a variety of theoretical approaches.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units/12 Lessons

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Develop an understanding of the major theories and themes underlying the study of human development.

    • Critically analyze the relative significance of human developmental processes over the course of the life span based on empirical research and real-life experiences.

    • Examine and interpret the interrelationships between the domains of physical, cognitive, and socioemotional human development across the life span.
       
    • Consider the impact of individual differences and cultural/societal influences upon human development.
       
    • Think critically about the application of human developmental research across a variety of disciplines.
       
    • Gain a better understanding of your own human development, the positive and negative influences of the social environment, and biological factors.

     

    Credits: 3


  •  

    SO 310 - Aging in America


    Presents concepts related to physiological, psychological, and social factors important in the aging process and their implications for health services. Includes an in-depth exploration of the social, political, economic, and ethical parameters of alternative approaches to services delivery.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 6 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • View aging as a biopsychosocial process rather than a simple event and understand self, family, colleagues, and clients as aging individuals.
    • Differentiate between normal changes of aging and illness states common in aging individuals. 
    • Apply major theories of aging from biology, psychology, and sociology to interpret how people age in U.S. society.
    • Identify societal, community, and health-care resources for positive and successful aging. 
    • Identify some of the political, social, and economic issues important to health-care systems as they deal with the needs of aging clients. 
    • Recognize the wide range of existing alternatives for delivery of health care to aging people and identify opportunities for development of additional services based on identified needs and societal trends.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    SO 320 - Race and Ethnic Relations


    Explores patterns of inter-group relationships between various religious and ethnic groups that comprise American society. Processes of racial and cultural contact between peoples, especially in regard to the origin and development of American minority groups are explored. Focus is on integration, segregation, and cultural pluralism. Social theories of racial and ethnic aggression and minority responses to oppression are also examined.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Recognize the sociological perspective, or the interplay of the individual and society and how individuals are shaped by the cultural context of the societies in which they live. 
    • Demonstrate an understanding of majority/minority group relations, and how these relationships have come to be. 
    • Identify the various forms of prejudice and discrimination, and theories that seek to explain them. 
    • Examine the development of racial categories throughout the history of the United States. 
    • Examine the relationship between and among related factors such as immigration and religion in connection to race and ethnicity. 
    • Analyze and examine how the relationships among cultural, economic, political, social, and historical events shape various ethnic- and racial-group experiences in the United States. 
    • Evaluate how race relations around the world are similar to and different from the U.S. experience.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    SO 321 - Special Topics: Films of Crime and Punishment


    This course examines and analyzes film portrayals of both crime and punishment. Specifically, the course has students consider how our understanding of crime, criminals and criminal behavior may be shaped by film. The course seeks to examine the portrayals of the criminal justice system itself; how it functions, the actors within the system and the culture that surrounds the system. Furthermore, it is designed to analyze how films create societal response narratives by way of punishment portrayals. Students consider how film comes to shape the political and social debate surrounding how justice is best administered by a society.

    The online format allows students to interact with the professor and other students in asynchronous discussion boards. Online course materials will help clarify points made by the author(s). Discussions will help other students think critically about issues surrounding particular issues related to crime and the media. It is crucial that students actively engage in the discussion boards as they are the focal point in the online environment. The week long on campus component of the course is designed to have a more in-depth discussion about the key themes identified and to develop a more critical mindset when assessing popular culture depictions of crime, criminality and justice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is being offered during the 2017 summer session with an on campus component.

     

    Course Learning Objectives

    • Describe the key elements of the various theories of crime, punishment and criminality; 
    • Examine how film (as a popular culture medium) comes to shape and construct crime, crime control, victims of crime and the agents of crime control;  
    • Discuss and explore the portrayals of race, class and gender as related to crime/criminality in various films;
    • Analyze the biosocial, psychological and sociological perspectives of criminality within film;
    • Evaluate the impact that various cinematic portrayals and crime and criminality may have on the public’s perception. 


    Credits: 3 Offered: Online: Summer Session 2017, Week 2

  •  

    SO 333 - Victimology


    This course is designed to introduce you to how criminologists and victimologists study violence and victimization. Not only will you explore the various forms of victimization, but you will also be exposed to the various theories that seek to provide an explanation for these crimes. Furthermore, you will come to understand how the criminal justice system has responded to victims and various crimes. The course is designed to be interactive with discussion boards that seek to explore and examine key issues raised in the readings. The final course project allows you to interact with a criminal justice professional and get his or her take on key issues you have been examining during the course. 

     

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This is a general elective, and it is strongly encouraged for students taking the Criminal Justice minor in Interdisciplinary Studies. 

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 6 Units/12 Lessons
    Interactivity: Discussion Board
    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Recognize how victimologists and criminologists study victimization.
    • Examine the various forms of victimization.
    • Discuss the various theories of victimization.
    • Discuss the response to victimization.
    • Analyze the scope of victim’s rights. 


    Credits: 3

  •  

    SO 343 - Introduction to Corrections


    This course will focus on the corrections component of the American criminal justice system as it relates to the conditions faced by those incarcerated within its jails and prisons. The course is an overview of the nation’s prisons and jails as well as the various community services available, which is also a part of the system.

    The course will survey the historical, sociological, political, and legal evolution of the American correctional system. An overview of various organizations and legal structures within the system, as well as theory and evidence of methods of punishment will be examined. Issues will include studying the dynamics of reentry, the death penalty, women in prison, prison violence, race and ethnicity issues in corrections, and mental health issues of offenders.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units
    Interactivity: None
    Final Assessment: Final Project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Describe the history of the correctional system and the organization of the modern correctional system.

    • Identify the key legal issues related to sentencing, punishment, and incarceration.

    • Understand and discuss the various correctional practices, including probation, institutional corrections, community corrections, and parole.

    • Examine and relate the issues related to life inside of prison.

    • Describe the process of reentry and the challenges facing those returning home after incarceration.

    • Explore and describe the issues facing corrections professionals in the 21st century and beyond.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    SO 353 - Critical Issues in Policing


    This course will explore critical issues confronting contemporary law enforcement, as well as show these issues have shaped modern policing in America. A central course objective is the examination of these critical issues as they relate to the contexts of law, policy, community, and actual and perceived threats to public safety and crime.  Through course readings, discussion board dialogue, and individual research, students will develop an understanding of the complexities and challenges of modern policing and discuss potential solutions.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion forum

    Final Assessment: Final Project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, students should be able to do the following:

    • Examine the concept of traditional policing i.e. the foundation of the role of police in society and how policing has evolved.

    • Identify and describe the complexities of modern policing and the associated challenges to selecting, hiring, and training police officers.

    • Analyze the concept of police discretion and how discretion is used and abused.

    • Analyze how ethics impact an officer’s ability to effectively perform his or her mission, credibility in the courtroom, police/community relations and acceptance by peers.

    • Investigate and discuss the unique challenges women and minorities in law enforcement experience in the hiring and promotion process, establishing and maintaining professional credibility and acceptance by their peers.

    • Recognize and examine the sources and consequences of police related stress.  


    Credits: 3

  •  

    SO 400 - Critical Issues in Criminal Justice


    This course examines key issues related to law enforcement, the courts, and corrections.  A close examination of ethics in criminal justice, environmental crime, sex crimes, cyber crimes, terrorism, and white-collar crime will be focused on throughout.  Students will also come to examine the complexities of race, culture, class, and gender as part of the larger context in which to explore these issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite:  EH 106 is required and EH 107 is recommended.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion forum

    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    ·    Identify and critically examine key issues related to crime and justice in the 21st century.

    ·    Explain how issues are constructed from a historical, social, and political perspective.

    ·    Discuss the ways in which the criminal justice system responds to key issues.

    ·    Examine the importance of ethics in the study of issues related to criminal justice.

    ·    Examine, analyze, and present solutions to key critical issues in criminal justice.

    Credits: 3


  •  

    SO 405 - Law & Society


    This course is designed to examine the nature, functions, limitations, and objectives of law using a multi-disciplinary approach. A great deal of time will be spent critically evaluating and discussing the theoretical perspectives of law, the organization of law, the perspectives of lawmaking, how law is utilized in terms of a mechanism of social control, how law is utilized in dispute resolution, and how law is utilized as a social change mechanism. Attention will also be spent on examining the legal profession and its connection with the rise and development of legal systems. Lastly, the course will take a look at how law can be researched to better our understanding of law, society, and social policy.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EH 106 or equivalent is required; EH 107 or equivalent is recommended.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units
    Interactivity: Discussion Boards
    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Discuss the nature, function, and history of criminal law in society.
    • Describe criminal liability and how it is applied within the criminal justice system.
    • Identify the legal aspects of crime types.
    • Examine the key dimensions of criminal procedure and;
    • Discuss the key legal issues facing the criminal justice system today.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    SO 406 - Senior Seminar


    Under staff guidance, students propose, design, and implement their own individual research project which serves to integrate, apply and expand students’ knowledge and skills of their major field. The seminar paper demonstrates students’ ability to carry out research. Provides opportunities to develop an integrated knowledge of the major consistent with entry-level professional standards.

    Credits: 3 credits
  •  

    SP 202 - Everday Spanish in the United States I


    This course will foster cultural awareness and increase language fluency, so you can communicate with and learn from Spanish speakers in the United States. In this course, you will approximate the immersion experience by watching videos in Spanish and listening to contemporary Spanish language music, discussing Latino culture with classmates and the professor in Spanish, and interviewing a native Spanish speaker. This course will give you the tools needed to begin communicating comfortably in Spanish.  

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 4 Units/12 Lessons

    Interactivity: Discussion Board; VoiceThread

    Final Assessment: Oral History Project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Explain the value of developing authentic connections with native Spanish speakers,
    • Recognize and use appropriate language for basic communication with native Spanish speakers in the United States, through reading, writing, speaking, and listening,
    • Compare and contrast language differences among Spanish speakers both within the United States and abroad, and
    • Engage in the community to mutually learn and reflect upon the Spanish speaking culture.


    Credits: 3 credits

  • Nursing Department

    Courses

  •  

    NU 300 - Professional Transitions


    The course provides an overview of contemporary professional nursing practice with a focus on developing reflective practice through developing and utilizing critical thinking and decision-making skills. The course draws from present literature relating to critical thinking and decision making within complex health care situations.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: None


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Incorporate effective communication techniques, including negotiation and conflict resolution to produce positive professional working relationships (AACN VI, 3).

    • Contribute the unique nursing perspective to interprofessional teams to optimize patient outcomes (AACN VI, 4).

    • Demonstrate appropriate team building and collaborative strategies when working with interprofessional teams (AACN IV, 5).

    • Demonstrate an appreciation of the history of and contemporary issues in nursing and their impact on current nursing practice (AACN VIII, 5).

    • Reflect on oneseliefs and values as they relate to professional practice (AACN VIII, 6).

    • Identify personal, professional, and environmental risks that impact personal and professional choices and behaviors (AACN VIII, 7).



    Credits: 3

  •  

    NU 309 - Evidence-Based Practice


    This course focuses on the role of nurses as research consumers and highlights how consumers of research contribute to the development of evidence-based practice. Students gain an understanding of the research process, how to read research critically, and the ability to understand and evaluate quantitative, qualitative, and outcomes research reports and to summarize research evidence to make changes in practice. Knowledge generated from nursing research when integrated with clinical expertise and patient needs provides a framework for making clinically effective individualized decisions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 300, MA 205

    Credits: 3
  •  

    NU 316 - Health Assessment for RNs


    This course focuses the RN-BSN student to apply critical thinking and reasoning in the assessment of the health status of individuals. Using evidence-based practice and a systematic holistic approach to health history-including physical, developmental, psychosocial, cultural, and spiritual dimensions-and physical examination are emphasized.

    Credits: 4
  •  

    NU 321 - Clinical Prevention and Population Management


    This course focuses on health promotion, disease, and injury prevention across the lifespan at the individual and population levels. Health promotion, disease and injury prevention throughout the lifespan includes assisting individuals families groups, communities, and populations to prepare for and minimize health consequences of emergencies, including mass casualty disasters. The aggregate, community, or population is the unit of nursing care (AACN VII).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 300

    Credits: 4
  •  

    NU 407P - Evidence Based Practice Clinical Capstone


    The student is guided through continued exploration, integration and synthesis of major concepts presented throughout previous courses in the context of clinical application. The course has two distinct but integrated foci. The first is the development and evaluation of programs to promote health in communities and their residents through the use of strategies that are based upon assessment and research evidence. The second focus is exploration and analysis of how leadership and management skills are utilized to assist in goal attainment. The student will adopt the leadership role in proposing, implementing and evaluating a formal program for clients in a selected agency. This practicum course requires 135 hours of clinical in an approved agency/setting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All NU RN-BSN courses

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Demonstrate integration of all prior course work through provision of safe, competent care.
    • Demonstrate critical thinking in independently appraising new situations (AACN VIII).
    • Identify and prioritize needs from assessment data using appropriate criteria drawn from public health theory (AACN VII).
    • Consistently apply nursing process to develop, evaluate, and revise plans of care AACN IX). 
    • State and apply legal, moral, ethical, and Christian humanistic principles in the care of patients, groups, or communities (AACN VII).
    • Seek out, critique, and utilize findings from evidence-based practice in clinical decision-making (AACN III).


    Credits: 3
  •  

    NU 412 - Healthcare Policy


    This course examines the nature and quality of health care delivery systems and health-related social programs from a nursing perspective. The role of the baccalaureate nurse requires scrutiny and understanding of social policy at the organizational, community state, federal and international level. Critical thinking skills and strategies needed by professional nurses to participate in health care planning and health care consumer advocacy for improved health services are emphasized.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All 300 level NU courses

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Demonstrate basic knowledge of healthcare policy, finance, and regulatory environments, including local, state, national, and global healthcare trends (AACN V, 1).
    • Describe how health care is organized and financed, including the implications of business principles, such as patient and system cost factors (AACN V, 2).
    • Compare the benefits and limitations of the major forms of reimbursement on the delivery of health care services (AACN V, 3).
    • Examine legislative and regulatory processes relevant to the provision of health care (AACN V, 4).
    • Describe state and national statutes, rules, and regulations that authorize and define professional nursing practice (AACN V, 5).
    • Examine the roles and responsibilities of the regulatory agencies and their effect on patient care quality, workplace safety, and the scope of nursing and other health professionals’ practice (AACN V, 7).


    Credits: 3
  •  

    NU 413 - Quality Care and Patient Safety


    The course focuses on working within organizational and community arenas and in the actual provision of care by themselves and/or supervising care provided by other licensed and non-licensed assertive personnel. Students will be able to recognize safety and quality concerns and apply evidence-based knowledge from the nursing profession and other clinical sciences to their practice (AACN II).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All 300 level NU courses

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Apply leadership concepts, skills, and decision making in the provision of high quality nursing care, healthcare team coordination, and the oversight and accountability for care delivery in a variety of settings (AACN II, 1).
    • Participate in quality and patient safety initiatives, recognizing that these are complex system issues, which involve individuals, families, groups, communities, populations, and other members of the healthcare team (AACN II, 5).
    • Apply concepts of quality and safety using structure, process, and outcome measures to identify clinical questions and describe the process of changing current practice (AACN II, 6).
    • Apply quality improvement processes to effectively implement patient safety initiatives and monitor performance measures, including nurse-sensitive indicators in the microsystem of care (AACN II, 9).


    Credits: 3
  •  

    NU 414 - Interprofessional Teams


    The course focuses on the four domains of Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (Interprofessional Education Collaborative, 2009). These core competencies provide integrated, high-quality care to patients within the nation’s current, evolving health care system.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All 300 level NU courses

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Assert values and ethics of interprofessional practice by placing the interests, dignity, and respect of patients at the center of health care delivery, and embracing the cultural diversity and differences of health care teams.
    • Leverage the unique roles and responsibilities of interprofessional partners to appropriately assess and address the health care needs of patients and populations served.
    • Communicate with patients, families, communities, and other health professionals in support of a team approach to preventing disease and disability, maintaining health, and treating disease.
    • Perform effectively in various team roles to deliver patient/population-centered care that is safe, timely, efficient, effective, and equitable.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    NU 415 - Leadership and Management for RNs


    Leadership in nursing focuses on organizational and systems leadership, quality improvement, and safety to promote high quality patient care.  This course will examine nursing leadership and management through the use of a systems approach with a focus on quality and safety of patient care. It will examine leadership models, behaviors, and strategic planning at organizational levels.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All 300 level NU courses

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Demonstrate appropriate team building and collaborative strategies when working with interprofessional teams (AACN VI).
    • Use inter and interprofessional communication and collaborative skills to deliver evidence-based, patient-centered care (AACN VI).
    • Apply Quality improvement processes to effectively implement patient safety initiatives and monitor performance measures, including nurse-sensitive indicators in the microsystem of care (AACN II).
    • Employ principles of quality improvement, healthcare policy, and cost-effectiveness to assist in the development and initiation of effective plans for microsystem and/or system-wide practice improvements that will improve the quality of healthcare delivery (AACN ll).
    • Participate in the development and implementation of imaginative and creative strategies to enable systems to change (AACN ll).


    Credits: 4
  • Social Work

    Courses

  •  

    SW 101 - Introduction to the Profession of Social Work


    Introduces the student to the profession of social work within the context of the social welfare system.  Provides an overview of an integrative approach to generalist social work emphasizing intervention on individual, environmental, and societal levels.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview: Weekly quizzes

    Assignments: 6-8 page paper with interview, experiential project

    Interactivity:  None

    Final Assessment None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Course Objectives:

    • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context
    • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations
    • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication
    • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes
    • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SW 207 - The Brain Processes and Social Work Practice


    This course will expose students to the human brain, how it functions and how social issues cause it to malfunction.  Mental illness, substance abuse, poverty, malnutrition will be discussed with the impact on the brain and the social interaction that occurs because of these issues. Scientifically proven interventions will be explored to minimize the damage caused by these social issues. This course was formerly SW 301.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-Requisite or prerequisite:  SW 310 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment II

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview: 3 Units

    Assignments: Weekly assignment choice of two, discussions

    Interactivity limited

    Final Assessment: None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Course Objectives:

    • Students will understand basic brain function and development
    • Students will be able to construct an intervention plan to counteract damages in brain development
    • Students will explain how social issues impact the brain development and functioning


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SW 208 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment micro


    Second course of a two-semester sequence.  Use of theory and empirical data to analyze human behavior, as it develops in a variety of sociopolitical environments.  Introduces a broad range of theories relating to biological, psychological, cognitive, and social development.  Focuses of the social, physical and intellectual development of the human being, from birth through death.  Semester-long inquiry describing how persons are in a continual state of growth throughout their life cycle.  Each new epic in their life span presents the person with new challenges, though changes in their physical, social and emotional environments.  Provides students with content about differences and similarities in the experiences, needs, and beliefs of people to enable them as social work practitioners to assess and serve diverse populations, including those distinguished by race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental ability, age, and national origin.  Focuses on studying individuals and families. formerly SW 310

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-Requisite:  SW 301 – The Brain Processes and Social Work Practice

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview:

    Assignments: 2 exams, discussions

    Interactivity limited

    Final Assessment: Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Course Objectives:

    • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context
    • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations
    • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication
    • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes
    • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior
    • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo and macro levels
    • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences
    • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies
    • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels
    • Engage in practices that advance social economic, and environmental justice
    • Use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies
    • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies
    • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies
    • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies
    • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SW 209 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment macro


    First course in a two-semester course sequence.  Use of theory and empirical data to analyze human behavior as it develops in a variety of sociopolitical environments.  Introduces students to a broad range of theories relating to biological, psychological, cognitive, and social development, and race, class, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation variables.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SW 101 - Introduction to the Profession of Social Work

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview: 3 mini papers

     Interactivity: None

    Final Assessment Presentation and paper on same topic

    Course Learning Objectives
    Course Objectives:

    • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context
    • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication
    • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo and macro levels
    • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences
    • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies
    • Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice
    • Engage in practices that advance social economic, and environmental justice
    • Assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies
    • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies
    • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies
    • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies
    • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies
    • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies
    • Use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes
    • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes
    • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes
    • Apply evaluation findings to improve practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SW 329 - Writing for the Profession of Social Work


    Prepares BSW students to successfully master the skill of writing professionally and effectively.  Coursework and activities provide a hands-on experience with social work writing tasks.  Topics addressed include standards for scholarly writing, conducting literature reviews, writing mechanics, writing logically and coherently, adhering to APA format, writing for social media, the use of strengths-based language, and resume writing.  Intended to strengthen students’ writing, an essential social work skill, and to support students’ efforts on writing tasks assigned in future courses, internship placements, and in the field of social work. Formerly SW 201

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SW 101 - Introduction to the Profession of Social Work

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview: 4 small assignments, 1 Quiz

    Assignments: Interactivity drop box exchange with fellow students

    Final Assessment: paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Course Objectives:

    • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication
    • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies
    • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies
    • Negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of clients and constituencies


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SW 330 - Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families


    Integrates theory with practice by developing theory-based assessment.  Examines generalist professional social work practice, through the lenses of social justice and human rights for our clients. Emphasizes interviewing skills and assessment strategies, particularly in relationship to various ethno cultures, social classes and oppressed populations.  Includes assessment and evaluation based on the strengths perspective as a way to help individuals and groups to realize their fullest potential in life. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: SW 330L

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: midterm, quiz, final paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    In accordance with the Council on Social Work’s Education Educational and Accreditation Standards, the following core competencies and practice behaviors are critical to successful outcome in this course:

    1.

    Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

    1a.

    Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context

    1b.

    Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations

    1c.

    Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication

     

    1d.

    Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes

     

    1e.

    Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior

    2.

    Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

    2a.

    Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo and macro levels

    2b.

    Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences

    2c.

    Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies

    3

    Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

    3a.

    Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels

    3b.

    Engage in practices that advance social economic, and environmental justice

    4

    Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice

    4a.

    Use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research

    6

    Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

    6a.

    Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies

    6b.

    Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies

    7

    Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

     

    7a.

    Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies

    7b.

    Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies

    7c.

    Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies

    7d.

    Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies



    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SW 330L - Social Work Practice Lab for Individuals and Families


    Provides student a hands-on experience with the engagement, assessment, and beginning intervention skills using the tools taught in SW330 Social Work Practice with Individual and Families course.  Familiarizes students with videotaping equipment and develops strong assessment skills to be used with clients in the field.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-Requisite:  SW 330 - Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview: 2 units

    Assignments Test, charting, 2 video critiques

    Interactivity: extensive, none synchronous

    Final Assessment None

    Course Learning Objectives
    Course Objectives:

    • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations
    • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication
    • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior
    • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo and macro levels
    • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences
    • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies
    • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies
    • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies
    • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies
    • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies


    Credits: 1 credit

  •  

    SW 331 - Social Work Practice with Groups


    Builds on social work practice, knowledge, skills and techniques.  Describes social work practice with groups and begins by delving into the history and theory of group work in social work practice.  Explains the stages of group development, as well as concepts and theories related to group work treatment.  Presents different styles of group leadership, as well as group member roles.  Role-playing various stages of group development is required.  Incorporates an ecosystems perspective, with overall emphasis on utilizing a strengths perspective.  Focuses on:  human rights, social and economic justice, diversity and cultural issues with respect to social work practice with groups.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview: 4 Units

    Assignments: Proposal, Midterm

    Interactivity: High

    Final Assessment: Video project

    Course Learning Objectives
    Course Objectives:

    • Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior
    •  Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context
    •  Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations
    •  Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication
    •  Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes
    • Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice
    •  Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences
    • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies
    • Engage in practices that advance social economic, and environmental justice
    • Use and translate research evidence to inform and improve practice, policy, and service delivery
    • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies
    • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies
    • Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
    • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies
    • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies
    • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies
    • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies
    • Facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals
    • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SW 332 - Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities


    This course, required of all social work majors, has two purposes.  Introduces students, through the framework of social change theory, to macro social work practice at the local, national, and international levels.  Focuses on:  empowerment practice in macro social work, with an emphasis on human rights, through the perspective of social and economic justice. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Pre-Requisite:  SW 209

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview: 5 Units

    Assignments: 100 hr. internship, 1 papers, discussions, journal

    Interactivity: high in class and in internship

    Final Assessment: Paper, field evaluation

    Course Learning Objectives
    Course Objectives:

    • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context
    •  Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations
    •  Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication
    • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes
    • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior
    • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo and macro levels
    • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences
    • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies
    • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels
    • Engage in practices that advance social economic, and environmental justice
    • Apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative methods and research findings
    • Use and translate research evidence to inform and improve practice, policy, and service delivery
    • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services
    • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice
    • Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies
    • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies
    • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies
    • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies
    • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies
       


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SW 402 - Social Welfare and Policy and Services I


    Examines the values and norms that underlie social welfare services; the historical roots of current approaches to social services; the overt and covert functions of social welfare; and the political, social, cultural and economic forces that shape social welfare policy and services in the United States.  Considers the parallel historical development of the profession of social work, including ways in which it responded to the demands of social problems across key periods of social welfare policy transformation.  Develops an understanding of poverty in the US by reviewing the myths and facts related to this severe social issue.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Pre-Requisite:  SW 101

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview: 4 Units

    Assignments: Discussion, exam, 2 small paper

    Interactivity None

    Final Assessment:  Final paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Course Objectives:

    • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication
    • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo and macro levels
    • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels
    • Engage in practices that advance social economic, and environmental justice
    • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services
    • Assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services
    • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice
    • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies
    • Use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes
    • Negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of clients and constituencies
    • Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
    • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes
    • Apply evaluation findings to improve practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SW 403 - Social Welfare and Policy and Services II


    Assumes a basic knowledge acquired from Social Welfare Policies and Services I of the prevailing values, beliefs, and norms that have shaped the history of social welfare in the United States.  Students critically analyze contemporary social welfare policy framework that emphasizes dimensions of choice and diversity in the functional areas of social allocations, social provisions, delivery system structure, program financing and program planning,  Emphasizes the impact of values and professional ethics on policy analysis and program development and the impact of social welfare policy decisions upon oppressed groups including their implications for human rights and social and economic justice,  Discusses increasing awareness and appreciation of the issues and problems associated with institutional discrimination and the advancement of policy strategies to overcome social exclusion.  Analysis and evaluation of policy are essential parts of the policy formation process.  Prepares students using a strengths based approach to effectively utilize social policy formulation and analysis as a generalist social work practitioner to achieve socially just policies for families in a global context.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Pre-Requisite:  SW 402

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview: 4 Units

    Assignments 4 mini papers leading to final paper

    Interactivity: High

    Final Assessment: paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Course Objectives:

    • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context
    • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication
    • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes
    • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo and macro levels
    • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences
    • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels
    • Engage in practices that advance social economic, and environmental justice
    • Use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research
    • Apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative methods and research findings
    • Use and translate research evidence to inform and improve practice, policy, and service delivery
    • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services
    • Assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services
    • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance   human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies
    • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies
    • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes


    Credits: 3 credits

  •  

    SW 406 - Integrative Senior Seminar for Social Work


    This course is a capstone course for the Social Work program.  In this course students will spend the time being both reflective and introspective.  In reflecting, student will look at past works to help solidify and quantify the new knowledge, skills, values and cognitive and affective processes that developed.  While being introspective students will create portfolios, resumes and graduate school applications as appropriate for their current plans.  Finally, students will develop a project to leave with their senior internship that address a social justice need.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    all 300 level courses

    Assignment Overview
    Resume, graduate school application, portfolios and social justice project.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Use relection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations; 

    1. demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication;
    2. use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes; and 
    3. engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice.


    Credits: 3 credits
  •  

    SW 408 - Social Work Internship I


    First part of a yearlong seminar required of all social work students involved in a field practicum.  Integrates  experiences from the field with course work and personal reflection.  Topics include understanding the organization and the importance of a positive work ethic.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All 300 level courses

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview:  

    Assignments: 224 hr. internship, journal, reaction paper, group presentation

    Interactivity Medium-high

    Final Assessment field evaluation and final paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Course Objective:

    • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context
    • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations
    • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication
    • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes
    • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior
    • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo and macro levels
    • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences
    • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies
    • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels
    • Engage in practices that advance social economic, and environmental justice
    • Use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research
    • Apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative methods and research findings
    • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies
    • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies
    • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies
    • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies
    • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies
    • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies
    • Use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes
    • Negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of clients and constituencies
    • Facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals
    • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes
    • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes
    • Apply evaluation findings to improve practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels


    Credits: 6 credits

  •  

    SW 409 - Social Work Internship II


    Second part of a yearlong seminar required of all social work students involved in a field practicum.  Integrates the field experience with course work and personal reflection.  Explores insights into students’ personal values, interpersonal strengths, and personal motivators to develop a sense of self as a professional. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Pre-Requisite:  SW 408

    Assignment Overview
    Assignment Overview: 3 units

    Assignments  Internship 224 hours role play, cultural interviews

    Interactivity  Medium

    Final Assessment  Field evaluation and paper

    Course Learning Objectives
     

    Course Objectives:

    • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context
    • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations
    • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication
    • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes
    • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior
    • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo and macro levels
    • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences
    • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies
    • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels
    • Engage in practices that advance social economic, and environmental justice
    • Use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research
    • Apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative methods and research findings
    • Use and translate research evidence to inform and improve practice, policy, and service delivery
    • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services
    • Assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services
    • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies
    • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies
    • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies
    • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies
    • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies
    • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies
    • Use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes
    • Negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of clients and constituencies
    • Facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals
    • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes
    • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes
    • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes
    • Apply evaluation findings to improve practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels


    Credits: 6 credits

  • Theology Studies Department

    Courses

  •  

    TH 015 - The Catechism for Catechists


    The Catechism for Catechists is a non-credit certificate course designed for students at any level that provides intellectual formation for catechists and can serve ideally as the doctrinal component for diocesan catechist certification programs. For those serving as parish catechists or teaching the Catholic faith in the Catholic school system, as well as those interested in general adult faith formation or RCIA, it enables students to develop an understanding and appreciation of the Catholic faith.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Assignment Overview
    Pass/Fail

    Course Learning Objectives
     

    • Understand and articulate the foundations of Catholic doctrine;
    • Converse on matters of Sacred Scripture;
    • Differentiate between missions and natures of the Trinity and the Church;
    • Explain the liturgy and the sacraments;
    • Discern the different aspects of Catholic spirituality;
    • Understand and articulate Catholic moral teaching.


    Credits: 0

  •  

    TH 100 - Introduction to the Judeo-Christian Tradition


    An introduction to the history, contents, and lived-experiences of the Christian faith. This course does not contribute towards the Bachelor of Arts in Theological Studies but may be taken as a general elective. This course previously was listed as TH 105. Students who took TH 105 should not take this course.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units
    Interactivity: Discussion Board

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Give evidence of having reflected deeply upon the sources, doctrines, and teaching of Christian faith by:
      •  Defining key Christian concepts and their development.
      •  Describing key events and persons in Christian history.
      •  Offering an explanation for some pivotal historical decisions in Christian history.
    • Give evidence of having understood the faith expressions of some other contemporary and historical Christians by:
      • Discussing the contents of select original texts with other students and the instructor.
      • Discerning elements of Christian faith within the life experiences of select men and women.
      • Describing a synthetic understanding of their faith in comparison to the faith as described in scripture and theology.
    • Offer an articulate and well-reasoned rationale for ones own faith or for ones own beliefs and attitudes with respect to the faith of those people who have been surveyed in the course by:
      • Completing a summative essay incorporating, by reference, the doctrinal, historical, objective, and subjective elements of the course.
      • Incorporating a strongly personal statement of faith and values in comparison (building upon, disagreeing with, adding on to, subtracting from) to the doctrinal, historical, objective, and subjective elements of the course.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    TH 101 - Catholic Doctrine and Theology


    A systematic introduction to Catholic doctrine and theology based on the study of the Nicene Creed with an emphasis on the “distinctively Catholic.” The course provides the basis for the program in Theological Studies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is normally taken as the first course in the Theological Studies major.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board

     

    Course Learning Objectives
     Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    •  Recognize the depth and breadth of Catholic doctrine and teaching found in, and based on, the Apostles and Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creeds.
    •  Explain the relationship between faith, believing, doctrine, dogma, and theology.
    •  Define key Christian concepts and their development.
    •  Use the Catechism of the Catholic Church as a theological source book.
    •  Identify the role of the distinctively Catholic in Catholic doctrine and theology.

     

    Credits: 3


  •  

    TH 102 - Introduction to the New Testament


    An introduction to the cultural, historical, and religious milieu in which Christianity emerged and developed in its first century emphasizing the Letters of Paul and the four Gospels.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    TH 104

    This course is offered online as part of the Theology curriculum with monthly start dates. 

    It will also be offered during the 2017 summer session with an on campus component.

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Demonstrate a positive familiarity with the four Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, and St. Paul.
    • Recognize the literary forms used within the New Testament.
    • Understand the perspectives of the Gospel writers as they relate to the communities for/to which they were writing.
    • Note the contemporary historical influences on the Gospels and the writings of St. Paul.
    • Recognize the various problems associated with the study of the New Testament.


    Credits: 3 Offered: Online; Summer 2017, Week 2

  •  

    TH 104 - Introduction to the Old Testament


    An introduction to the historical and religious background of the texts of the Old Testament; to the study of the methods of interpretation; and a survey of the books, and significant passages, of the Old Testament.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is offered online as part of the Theology curriculum with monthly start dates. 

    It will also be offered during the 2017 summer session with an on campus component.

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 6 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Recognize the literature of the Old Testament and be knowledgeable of significant books and passages of the Old Testament.
    • Explain the religion and history of ancient Israel that are reflected in the Old Testament.
    • Take TH 102: Introduction to the New Testament.

     

    Credits: 3 Offered: Online; Summer 2017, Week 1


  •  

    TH 106 - Catholic Doctrine for Catechists


    An introduction to the concept of Divine Revelation, its sources, and its relationship to human reason. The course considers the importance of a Catholic catechesis on creation for one’s understanding of the meaning of life (its origin and end), and how different beliefs about creation result in conflicting worldviews.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is required for the Certificate in Catholic Catechesis and also may be taken as an elective in undergraduate theology programs.

    Assignment Overview
    5 Lessons

    Course Learning Objectives
    1.) Define Divine Revelation

    2.) Describe the two sources of divine revelation

    3.) Explain the Catholic understanding of Creation and its implications for the meaning of life

    4.) Describe select modern worldviews (including pantheism, dualism, gnosticism, deism, and materialism) and how they differ from the Catholic worldview

    5) Describe the role of faith in the life of the Church

    Credits: 1


  •  

    TH 107 - Liturgy and Sacraments for Catechists


    An introduction to the theology of the sacraments, including the biblical roots and the relationship to the Paschal Mystery of each of the seven sacraments. The course examines the conditions for valid and fruitful sacramental participation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is required for the Certificate in Catholic Catechesis and also may be taken as an elective in undergraduate theology programs.

    Assignment Overview
    5 Lessons

    Course Learning Objectives
    1.) Define the term liturgy

    2.) Explain the seasons of the liturgical year

    3.) Describe the Liturgy of the Word and Liturgy of the Eucharist

    4.) Locate the biblical roots of each of the seven sacraments and the rites of the Catholic Church

    5.) Explain the role of each sacrament in God’s plan of salvation

    6.) Describe the matter, form, ordinary minister, and recipient of each sacrament.

    7.) Define the terms ex opere operato and ex opera operantis and explain their relevance for fruitful participation in the sacramental life of the Church.

     

    Credits: 1


  •  

    TH 108 - Catholic Spirituality for Catechists


    An introduction to Catholic spirituality and the vital role of liturgy within it. The course examines the theological aspects of prayer that are distinctively Catholic and the variety in expression of prayer in the Christian life. It offers guides to a fruitful life of prayer in the Church.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is required for the Certificate in Catholic Catechesis and also may be taken as an elective in undergraduate theology programs.

    Assignment Overview
    5 Lessons

    Course Learning Objectives
    1. Define the terms and state the purpose of spirituality and prayer

    2. List and describe the five forms of prayer revealed through Sacred Tradition

    3. List and describe the wellsprings of prayer in Catholic spirituality

    4. Describe both the Trinitarian and Marian dimensions of Catholic spirituality

    5. List and describe the guides for prayer in the Church

    6. Describe the fruits of participation in the sacraments, as well as familiarity with the saints and the use of sacramentals, for a vibrant Catholic spirituality

    7. Describe and give examples of the three major expressions of prayer: vocal, meditation, and contemplation.

    8. Explain the reasons why the Lord’s Prayer is at the core of Christian spirituality

    Credits: 1


  •  

    TH 109 - Catholic Moral Theology for Catechists


    An introduction to the foundations of Catholic moral theology. The course explores the concepts of the dignity of the human person, the vocation to beatitude, freedom, and conscience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is required for the Certifcate in Catholic Catechesis and may be taken as an elecive in undergraduate theology programs.

    Assignment Overview
    5 Lessons

    Course Learning Objectives
    1.) Describe the implications of human beings being made in the image and likeness of God

    2.) List the Beatitudes and explain their relevance for the moral life

    3.) Explain the Catholic understanding of freedom and contrast it to that of the secular worldview

    4.) Explain the concept of conscience and how it is exercised in the Catholic moral life.

    5.) Explain the basics of Catholic Social Teaching

     

    Credits: 1


  •  

    TH 110 - Sacred Scripture for Catechists


    An introduction to the revelation of God through His Word. The course offers a summary of the story of the covenant, and introduces the major figures and events of salvation history.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is required for the Certificate in Catholic Catechesis and also may be taken as an elective in undergraduate theology programs.

    Assignment Overview
    5 Lessons

    Course Learning Objectives
    1.) Explain the Catholic perspective on Biblical interpretation, translation, canon, use, and authority.

    2.) List and describe key figures of the Old Testament: Adam and Eve, Noah, Abraham, Moses, Samuel, David, Isaiah, Ezekiel, Jeremiah

    3.) List and describe key figures of the New Testament: Jesus, Peter, Paul

    4.) List and describe key events of salvation history: Creation, The Fall, The Flood, The Abrahamic Covenant, The Exodus, The Rise and Fall of the kingdom, The Prophecy of the Messiah, The Coming of the Messiah

    Credits: 1


  •  

    TH 111 - The Trinity and the Church for Catechists


    An introduction to the doctrine of the Trinity and its revelation in the person of Jesus Christ. The course examines the Trinity as a communion of persons united in love and explores the Incarnation as the means by which this love is made known to human beings and by which human beings are brought into union with the divine life through the Paschal Mystery.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is required for the Certificate in Catholic Catechesis and also may be taken as an elective in undergraduate theology programs.

    Assignment Overview
    5 Lessons

    Course Learning Objectives
    1.) Explain how the three persons of the Trinity are one, are distinct from one another, and are relative to one another.

    2.) Explain the divine missions of each person of the Trinity

    3.) Explain the reasons for the Incarnation.

    4.) Explain the roles of each person of the Trinity in the resurrection of Jesus Christ

    5.) Describe the nature of Christ

    6.) Describe the nature of the Church

    7.) Describe the role of Mary as Mother of God and Mother of the Church

     

    Credits: 1


  •  

    TH 210 - Fundamental Doctrines and their Development


    Students will examine the relationships among faith, reason, and revelation in the development of several key theological doctrines. They will study significant thinkers, historical documents, controversies, events, and historical periods.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Participation


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Explain the relationship between faith and reason.
    • Explain the relationship between faith and theology.
    • Demonstrate your understanding of the importance of revelation as God’s self-communication to the world.
    • Recognize the difference between the traditional Christian thinking about God and the modern confusions that lead to agnosticism and atheism.
    • Describe why grace and freedom are both essential elements of the Catholic faith.
    • List the reasons why the interpretation of the Bible within the Church is neither fundamentalism nor rationalism.
    • Describe the inseparability of the message of Jesus and his identity as the Word of God.
    • Name the key historical moments in the development of the doctrines of the Incarnation and the Trinity.
    • List the reasons why the Church and her sacraments are an essential dimension of God’s saving action in the world.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    TH 211 - Foundations of Catholic Spirituality


    This course explores the relationship between God and the human person.  It considers Eastern and Western models of spirituality with special focus on the experiences of personal and communal prayer as a means of developing and living a deeply Christian spiritual life.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 6 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Identify the unique features of Catholic spirituality as Catholic.
    • Reflect intellectually on the sources of Catholic spirituality.
    • Recognize that life in Christ is the essence of Catholic spirituality.
    • Discuss how the saints are unique sources for understanding Catholic spirituality.
    • Identify the roles that prayer, meditation, and contemplation play in Catholic spirituality.
    • Explain how Catholic spirituality is related to the social doctrine of the Church.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    TH 220 - Fundamentals of Catholic Moral Theology


    The course examines the basic principles of Catholic moral theology. It focuses on the roles of scripture, tradition, and the magisterial in ethical decision-making and explores the following themes: freedom, conscience, sin and conversion, natural law, virtues, and moral norms as criteria for ethical judgment.

    Assignment Overview
     



    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Discuss the goal of morality as the perfection and happiness of the person.
    • Explain the concepts of freedom and conscience as used in Catholic moral theology.
    • Describe how the New Law of Grace differs from and completes the Old Law.
    • Analyze the sources of the human act and their effect on morality.
    • Distinguish between morally good and evil actions, based on the Ten Commandments.


    Credits: 3 Offered: Online: Summer Session 2016, Week 2: Semester 201703
  •  

    TH 222 - World Religions


    An introductory-level course, Comparative Religions describes and compares the world’s major religions with Christianity. It acquaints the student with historical and literary aspects of Hindu and Buddhist thought, moving to Western religions. It considers the nature of other religions, devoting the final segment to the study of the Judeo-Christian tradition. 

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Compare and contrast the major themes of seven traditional religions, including indigenous religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese traditional religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
    • Identify the historical changes these religions have experienced.
    • Evaluate the role of selected spiritual leaders in each of these traditions.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    TH 226 - The Sacraments


    This course begins with the study of Christ as Sacrament of God and the Church as Sacrament of Christ. It views the seven sacraments in the light of the liturgical renewal of Vatican II and gives special consideration to the relationship of the sacraments to Christology and Ecclesiology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is offered online as part of the Theology curriculum with monthly start dates. 

    It will also be offered during the 2016 summer session with an on campus component.

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Boards, Online Exams


    Course Learning Objectives
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the Catholic sacramental worldview of Vatican II
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the anthropological aspects of liturgy.
    • Demonstrate understanding of the Christological aspects of the seven sacraments.
    • Demonstrate understanding of the Trinitarian aspects of the seven sacraments.
    • Demonstrate understanding of the ecclesiological aspects of the seven sacraments.
    • Demonstrate understanding of the eschatological meaning of the seven sacraments.


    Credits: 3 Offered: Online; Summer Session 2016, Week 1: Semester 201703

  •  

    TH 227 - The Intercultural Catholic Church


    This course assists the student in developing knowledge and skills for ministry in an intercultural Church. Attention will be given to understanding the many cultures present in the Catholic Church and in American society.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    1. Identify the four marks of the Catholic Church, and demonstrate an understanding of Christ’s call for them to be manifest in the world.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the establishment and history of the Catholic Church in America.
    3. Explain the missionary character and constitutive elements of evangelization in the Catholic Church.
    4. Identify the periods of immigration to the United States, and explain their impact on the composition of Catholic communities throughout the country.
    5. Develop a plan for evangelization and cultural integration within Catholic parishes.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    TH 309 - Special Topics


    This course will focus on topics as they relate to theological studies.

    Credits: 3
  •  

    TH 311 - Church History I: Early and Medieval Catholicism


    The course is the first of a two-part survey of the evolution of the Catholic Church from Apostolic times to the present. Although concerned primarily with the story of the Catholic West, Church History I includes the history of the Orthodox East and the gradual separation of the Latin and Greek Churches in the course of the Middle Ages.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 6 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Explore the way Church structures, especially the papacy and the episcopacy, evolved in the first millennium as well as more of the Church’s history. 
    • Identify some of the ways (political, social, and educational) in which the Church responded to the declining Roman Empire in the West. 
    • Appreciate the role of monasticism, beginning with the desert fathers and culminating in the new mendicant orders of the Middle Ages, including its missionary activities. 
    • Understand the cultural and theological background to the East-West Schism. 
    • Recognize the difference between a patristic/monastic style of theology and the scholastic style that emerged in the twelfth century. 
    • Use historical examples to illustrate the social and embodied nature of the Spirit-led Church as it extends the Incarnation of Christ in the world. 
    • Evaluate and consult online reference and primary source materials that provide details of topics in Church history that go beyond the introductory level.


    Credits: 3

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    TH 312 - Church History II: Modern Catholicism


    This course traces the disintegration of Western Catholic unity, the Reformation and the Catholic Reform, the difficulties posed by a post-Christian culture, and the transition from a European to a world church. Special attention is given to the reform movements of the twentieth century.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    TH 311

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 6 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • List the ways Church structures, especially the papacy and the episcopacy, evolved from the Middle Ages until the present. 
    • Identify some of the ways (theological, political, social, and educational) in which the Church responded to the growth of nation states and the rise of modernity. 
    • Trace in outline the evolving role of religious orders, especially the new congregations that were formed during the Catholic Reformation. 
    • Write a summary of the cultural and theological background issues surrounding the Reformation and the Church’s response, especially in the Council of Trent. 
    • Write a summary of the cultural and theological background issues surrounding the rise of the Enlightenment and the Church’s struggle to come to terms with Modernity. 
    • Use historical examples to illustrate the social and embodied nature of the Spirit-led Church as it extends the Incarnation of Christ in the world. 
    • Evaluate and consult online reference and primary source materials that provide details of topics in Church history that go beyond the introductory level.


    Credits: 3

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    TH 313 - History of Black Catholics in the Church


    This course explores the history of Black Catholics in the Church, highlighting various saints and holy men and women from the early Church through the present, and culminating with the contemporary experience of Black Catholics in the United States.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Assess the social, intellectual, cultural, and religious characteristics of the major periods of Black Catholic history;
    • Identify key figures of Black Catholic history;
    • Critically evaluate personal religious and cultural assumptions;
    • Analyze and evaluate pastoral issues regarding religious education and evangelization in the Black Catholic community.
    • Contribute to maintaining and nurturing the history of Black Catholics for future generations.


    Credits: 3
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    TH 314 - Pastoral Leadership among Black Catholics


    This course prepares students for pastoral leadership roles in the Black Catholic community by addressing critical pastoral issues regarding family life, spirituality, liturgy, religious education, and evangelization in light of Church documents and statements

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • List and describe Church documents and statements relevant to ministry with Black Catholics;
    • Analyze and evaluate pastoral issues regarding family life in Black Catholic communities;
    • Analyze and evaluate pastoral issues regarding spirituality and liturgy in Black Catholic communities;
    • Analyze and evaluate pastoral issues regarding religious education and evangelization in Black Catholic communities.

       



    Credits: 3

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    TH 315 - Theology of Ecumenism


    Presents major events associated with the ecumenical movement, including establishment of the World Council of Churches and the convening of the Second Vatican Council. It explores the method of ecumenical dialogue and some of the obstacles to Christian unity.

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Forums
    • Final Assessment: None


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Explain the Biblical foundations of ecumenism. 
    • Describe the essential elements of ecclesiology, especially how they relate to or impact ecumenism. 
    • Explain your experience and understanding of ecumenism based on your own religious tradition and apply those elements to the historical and theological study of ecumenism. 
    • Engage in a dialogue with other religious traditions. 
    • Summarize the principles found in the Second Vatican Councils Decree on Ecumenism and explain its impact on the advancement of ecumenism. 
    • Describe the role of the world Council of Churches with regard to the mainline Protestant traditions and explain its impact on ecumenism. 
    • Identify some of the current obstacles to unity and offer some practical solutions to these challenges. 
    • Complete an ecumenical project.


    Credits: 3
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    TH 316 - History of Latino Catholics in the Church


    This course explores the history of Latino Catholics in the Church, highlighting various saints and holy men and women from the early Church through the present, and culminating with the contemporary experience of Latino Catholics in the United States.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of the course, you should be able to do the following:

    • List and explain the significance of key figures in Latino Catholic history;
    • Describe key historical events affecting the Latino Catholic faithful;
    • Analyze the Latino Catholic experience in the United States;
    • Evaluate Latino Catholic devotions and culture in relation to the universal Church.


    Credits: 3
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    TH 317 - Pastoral Leadership among Latino Catholics


    This course prepares students for pastoral leadership roles in the Latino Catholic community by addressing contemporary pastoral issues regarding family life, spirituality, liturgy, religious education, and evanagelization in light of church documents and statements.

    Assignment Overview
    5 Units

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • List and describe Church documents and statements relevant to ministry with Latino Catholics;
    • Analyze and evaluate pastoral issues regarding family life in the Latino Catholic community;
    • Analyze and evaluate pastoral issues regarding spirituality and liturgy in the Latino Catholic community.


    Credits: 3
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    TH 318 - Theology of the Church


    This course introduces basic doctrines regarding the identity of the Church and her mission in the modern world. Topics include the Church in God’s plan, various images of the Church, the four marks of the Church, her hierarchical structure, the commmunion of saints, Mary as mother of the Church, and the Church’s evangelizing mission to a secular society.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completing this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Identify the role of the Church in God’s plan for salvation;
    • Describe the images of the Church;
    • Explain the four marks of the Church;
    • Describe the hierarchal structure of the Church;
    • Explain the role of Mary and the saints in the life of the Church;
    • Describe the role of the Church in the modern world.


    Credits: 3
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    TH 319 - Foundations of Catholic Liturgy


    This course explores the theology of Catholic liturgy, including its Jewish antecedents, its biblical basis, and its relevance for the Christian life.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Articulate the Jewish meaning and practice of sacrifice;
    • Explain the act of liturgy as an act of redemption;
    • Describe the participation of human beings in divine worship;
    • Articulate the relationship between liturgy and social justice.


    Credits: 3
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    TH 330 - Fundamentals of Christology


    This course provides a solid Catholic understanding of the mysteries of the life and role of Jesus Christ as found in the New Testament, in the Fathers of the Church, in Medieval theologians, and among the best contemporary Catholic theologians. The emphasis is on the living faith of the Church as it seeks to understand the heart of the Gospel.

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Reflect intellectually on the living reality of the crucified and risen Christ;
    • Explain the functions of Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium, especially as expresed through the early Ecumenical Councils, in the study of Christology;
    • Recognize and express biblical Christolgy in terms of a theology of continuity between the Old and New Testaments;
    • Identify the major developments of Christological doctrine in the Patristic and Medieval eras, as well as the significant issues in Christology among contemporary Catholic scholars;
    • Relate and synthesize Christololgy with other branches of theology, such as Trinitarian theology, ecclesiology, sacramental theology, etc.;
    • Articulate Christological doctrine in a manner that accurately reflects the teachings of the Church and is appropriate to a pastoral and ministerial setting.


    Credits: 3
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    TH 335 - Introduction to Catholic Social Teaching


    This course examines the historical development and theological foundations of the social teaching of the Catholic Church. It provides a survey of the major Church documents that treat ethical questions pertaining to civil, economic, and political society. It explores the lives of Christian witnesses who exemplify these teachings in action and gives special attention to the Church’s social teaching as it develops in response to such contemporary issues as the environment, post-industrial society, globalization, and the just war theory.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    TH 220

    This course is offered online as part of the Theology curriculum with monthly start dates. 

    It will also be offered during the 2017 summer session with an on campus component.

    Assignment Overview
    Assignments: 5 Units

    Interactivity: Discussion Board

    Final Assessment:  Final Paper

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Identify and explain the various issues and ecclesial (Church) positions expounded in Catholic Social Teaching (CST).
    • Define and understand the narrow and broad meanings of CST. 
    • Synthesize the issues and ecclesial positions within the broad meaning of CST into a comprehensible whole.
    • Apply the broad meaning of CST more thoroughly.


    Credits: 3 Offered: Online; Summer 2017, Week 2

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    TH 340 - Theology of the Body


    This course will explore Pope John Paul II’s “theology of the body” in order to come to a deeper understanding of the theological meaning of the embodiment of the human person. It will examine theological issues pertaining to creation, sin, and redemption, as well as ethical and moral issues of human sexuality and gender.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    TH 220

    This course is offered online as part of the Theology curriculum with monthly start dates. 

    It will also be offered during the 2017 summer session with an on campus component.

    Assignment Overview

    • Assignments: 5 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following: 

    • Identify the structure of the theology of the body and its main points. 
    • Explain the major themes of John Paul II’s theology of the body. 
    • Analyze the text against the background of Catholic doctrine concerning theological anthropology, sin, and sexual ethics. 
    • Assess the theological value of John Paul II’s theology of the body.


    Credits: 3 Offered: Online; Summer 2017, Week 1

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    TH 350 - Aging, Spirituality, and Senior Health Care


    Grounded in a Judeo Christian foundation, this course provides a medical humanities perspective on aging. We will explore writings and research on aging, spirituality, and senior healthcare, written from diverse disciplines and faith backgrounds. Based upon a life span developmental model, we will apply an exploration of the aging process that is both integrative and interdisciplinary. This course does not contribute towards the Bachelor of Arts in Theological Studies, but may be taken as a general elective.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Assignment Overview
    • Assignments: 4 Units
    • Interactivity: Discussion Board
    • Final Assessment: Final Research Paper


    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, students should be able to do the following:

    • Describe key demographic characteristics of older adults which may impact the field of Senior Healthcare;
    • Identify ways in which one’s spirituality may influence health behaviors and outcomes;
    • Recognize the biological, sociological, psychological, and spiritual dimensions of aging;
    • Identity important cultural competencies needed to serve elder health consumers of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds;
    • Understand the spiritual challenges and opportunities of aging;
    • Respectfully integrate interfaith and cross-cultural views of seniors and caregivers;
    • Assess the impact of changes in the family life cycle and structure upon caregiving;
    • Describe key elements of a spiritual history and care program for older adults;
    • Understand ethical issues that surround end of life care;
    • Apply the principles of the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Healthcare Services to senior care;
    • Identify ways in which senior healthcare systems also may serve as spiritual care communities.


    Credits: 3
  •  

    TH 400 - Bachelor’s Thesis


    Students engage in deep, sustained, and focused theological research into an area of particular interest in the composition of a bachelor’s thesis.

     

     

     

     

     

    Prerequisites & Notes

    1. Completion of Theology Core Requirements.
    2. Consultation with advisor: TH 400 requires a three-month pre-enrollment period for preliminary research done before the student’s start date; therefore, the student must begin the process three months prior to the actual enrollment start date. 


    Assignment Overview
    Final Assessment: Final Paper

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:  

    • Integrate your understanding of various subjects in your area of study.
    • Engage in deep, sustained, and focused research into a particular area of theology.
    • Apply critical thinking, reading, and writing skills in the research and composition of a scholarly paper.


    Credits: 3

  •  

    TH 405 - Practicum in Theological Studies


    This course integrates theoretical knowledge and reflection with practical experience under the guidance of a field supervisor and faculty mentor.  The practicum is designed for the mature student nearing completion of the bachelor’s degree. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    1. TH 101, TH 220, TH 226, TH 330;
    2. Consultation with advisor: TH 405 requires a three-month pre-enrollment period for preliminary research and practicum setup before the student’s start date; therefore, the student must begin the process three months prior to the actual enrollment start date. 

     

    Course Learning Objectives
    Upon completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

    • Plan and execute a pastoral field experience.
    • Integrate theological knowledge and reflection with practical experience.
    • Sharpen communication skills through collaboration with the practicum supervisor, faculty mentor, and any persons involved with or affected by the field experience.
    • Deepen ones understanding of vocation.
    • Explore, with a view to discerning, a specific vocational direction.
    • Develop a Program Model that can be adapted for wider use.
    • Assess the outcomes of the practicum experience according to the objectives set forth in the Practicum Contract.

     

    Credits: 3